Coal Chute Cover for Ventilation

Joined
17 May 2022
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
I have a Victorian property with a basement that is becoming damper over time. One easy fix is to add more ventilation through our coal Chute. Currently, the chute is covered by a square metal cover that can be lifted off the hole in the ground just outside our kitchen window to access the chute.

I'm thinking I should somehow add ventilation to this by either drilling holes in the metal cover or getting a new one. However, if I do this I'm worried about rainwater penetration.

Does anyone have any ideas or has come across this before and has a good solution?

Many thanks
 
Sponsored Links
I have a Victorian property with a basement that is becoming damper over time. One easy fix is to add more ventilation through our coal Chute. Currently, the chute is covered by a square metal cover that can be lifted off the hole in the ground just outside our kitchen window to access the chute.

I'm thinking I should somehow add ventilation to this by either drilling holes in the metal cover or getting a new one. However, if I do this I'm worried about rainwater penetration.

Does anyone have any ideas or has come across this before and has a good solution?

Many thanks
Cellars/basements are inherently damp spaces. All the ventilation in the world won't change that. The best remedies I've seen are those that have a dedicated brick structure covering them with airbricks built in etc. The 'roof' was built using reducing plinth blue bricks.
 
Sorry I should have been more clear - I'm not expecting it to be completely dry, but wanted to increase airflow to reduce any issues with the timbers supporting the floor above the basement.

A brick structure covering the chute entrance you mean?
 

Attachments

  • cellar.jpg
    cellar.jpg
    438.2 KB · Views: 358
Sponsored Links
Although possibly used for living space, some terraced houses near me have what look like tiny conservatories/ roof lanterns over what was a coal hole?
 
IF the coal hole is on the front street then I'd say absolutely no - chain it down or some scally will be through it.

I have the above scenario, the cover has been chained down and sealant was put down first to prevent any water ingress.

Come up with other ways to ventilate.
 
This looks like a good solution thank you. We actually still get coal delivered through the hole as we have an original fire in the living room so this has given me the idea of just building a small brick structure with the hole still in and then placing the cover on that, so we can put the airbricks in that structure.
 
IF the coal hole is on the front street then I'd say absolutely no - chain it down or some scally will be through it.

I have the above scenario, the cover has been chained down and sealant was put down first to prevent any water ingress.

Come up with other ways to ventilate.
I think using the existing hole is our best ventilation option. There's no other easy route from the unventilated part of the basement to the outside without creating some form of channel.

The coal hole is in our yard rather than on a street so it's less concerning from that regard - still not ideal having a hole into the house I guess though.
 
Last edited:
Then a covered/raised grid over it so that whilst air can get in/out water cannot.
Having a fan to help circulate the air may also help.

Make it strong/secure.
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Back
Top