Copper to Plastic converter

S

snadge

Hi all

Iam about to fit a tall (vertical) radiator in one of the small bedrooms, after the faff on I had with the towel rail in kitchen using copper pipes I thought I would use plastic pipes on this one.

the pipes will be going into the wall up from the floor about 6 inches and coming out of the wall, we were thinking of using the silver plastic "wraps" you can get that go around copper/plastic pipes to make them look 'chrome' for the bits that stick out of the wall.

The plastic pipes will be merged onto the copper pipes already there.

can anyone advise on which sort/type of piping I should be using and anything else I may need to know?

can these pipes be fitted to the valves directly? or do they need to have a special fitting/join to use with the metal compression end (and brass olive) on the valve?

any advice would be great,

thanks in advance.
 
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You can fit plastic straight into any compression fitting ie valves but just needs a insert into the end of plastic pipe.
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What type of wall do you intend on fitting the plastic pipe into ie stud, block etc ?
 
S

snadge

Hi , thanks for the speedy reply and help,

its a block wall the pipes will be going into.

I see what you mean, those inserts must give it strength against the compression valve... thanks for that

so I would use them too join them onto the copper pipes too using standard metal compression join yes?
 
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S

snadge

well, there are currently two copper pipes there from the old rad.. I want to extend from those using plastic to the new rad (a couple feet away) - so I was thinking I could use those inserts you showed to connect the plastic pipes to the copper using standard metal 15mm compression joins? - then, plastic piping from there up into the wall, up about 8 inches or so from the floor to the rad valves...

the reason I wanted to try plastic was to see what it was like to work with as all rooms will be getting rads changed later, when I done the kitchens towel rail (which was much higher up and had longer runs and many bends) I had a right faff on with loads of compression bends, some were springing leaks after slight movement on the pipes, I had a right time of it so I thought plastic might be easier to work with as its more durable and probably easier to seal with plastic compression bends etc
 
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So you intend on running plastic up wall then 90 degree bend out wall to valves ?
 
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you'll never put a 90 degree on plastic pipe it won't bend that tight not like copper with a 90 elbow.
ok if it was a stud wall you can get a swept bend on it.
 
S

snadge

very sorry , I meant a bend using an elbow... sorry about that
 
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I wouldn't do that either pushfit or compression.
Any fitting should be accessable if you get a fault on the fitting it's plaster off and channel wall back out.
 
S

snadge

I wouldn't do that either pushfit or compression.
Any fitting should be accessable if you get a fault on the fitting it's plaster off and channel wall back out.

I see, unfortunately I have no choice as I cant bend pipes, thats how I done the towel rail in the kitchen too (last year)

EDIT: I see Q&B are selling benders for £39.99 - it might be worth buying if we are doing 2 or 3 other rads in similar fasion... I will ask her as its her house and build, if she doesnt want to fork out for it then not much i can do..

thanks for your help and pointing that out
 
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Well that's up to you if you take that chance.
I will only tell you the regs and what can/does go wrong with that choice.

But personally i'd do or get a plumber just to make you say a 4" length of copper 90 elbow then a approx 12" length of copper you can take it home fit in wall then use plastic to join etc under floor to existing pipework.
Take him 10 mins to knock that up and don't even have to come to your house if you know a local one knock on his door.

ps Even a bend done on a bender needs to be quite deep in the wall.
as a 90 elbow only needs to be buried about 25mm.
 
S

snadge

Well that's up to you if you take that chance.
I will only tell you the regs and what can/does go wrong with that choice.

But personally i'd do or get a plumber just to make you say a 4" length of copper 90 elbow then a approx 12" length of copper o you can take it home fit in wall then use plastic to join etc under floor to existing pipework.
Take him 10 mins to knock that up and don't even have to come to your house if you know a local one knock on his door.

Aye, I know one too that fitted our hob...

I will ask her what she wants to do because its her house and she paying for it.. I will tell her it might be best just paying £40 for a bender as we will be doing a few other rads in similar fashion and no doubt I will get more use out of it than just the bends for the rads too... I did have a faff on with using too many elbows on the towel rail like... I did leave it accessible though incase of problems.

not too mention money saved on elbows too ;)

thanks for all your advice, youve been a great help, I will let you know what she decides tomorrow

thanks again
 
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A simple pipe bender is a good investment, and will mean that with with a bit of practice, your work will stand a chance of looking a lot more "professional".

Get the best you can afford. I once had a tiny £25 Draper one which worked, but only just. Buying a slightly posher one from BES was a revealation!
 

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