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Cutting conti-board

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by cdbe, 3 Dec 2018.

  1. cdbe

    cdbe

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    I'm putting in some semi fitted wardrobes and will need to cut some of the (15/18mm) laminated chipboard carcasses, trims etc. What size router bit should I use and what's a reasonable make? The cuts will be visible - infill panels etc.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Yeahaa

    Yeahaa

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    1/2 inch dia , 50mm long , straight 2 flute cutter
     
  3. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    I'd say that a circular saw with a fine tooth blade would be a better choice of tool - routers are OK for trimming, but very slow for cutting, even if you have a heavy 1/2in router. In terms of the material itself the absolute best type of cutter to use on MFC (melamine faced chipboard) is the replaceable tip TCT type. That's because all chipboard contains a percentage of recycled materials which in turn may mean the occasional small screw, piece of meal, or even pieces of grit are all possibilities. Hitting one of those with a carbide tip will potentially chip or blunt it. Replaceable TC is therefore a simpler and more cost effective solution if you are doing a lot of material - it's also sharper than brazed carbide, but at a heck of a premium in price. On the other hand solid carbide spiral cutters, whilst offering a far smoother cut are very susceptible to damage and expensive to regrind, so they're not really a good idea on chipboard. For lower volume the only sane choice has to be ordinary brazed carbide. Size? The bigger the better, within reason. I often route MDF, MFC and MF-MDF with 19 or 20mm diameter cutters on 1/2in shanks because the heat-up more slowly (lessening scorching), the extra mass means that they slow down less under load, and the scallop patterns on edges are far less noticeable - but they do need a big router (1/2in 1800 watts and up) for effective use - you aren't going to run one of them on an 8mm plunge router. One thing which helps get a smooth cut is using dust extraction on the router, ideally from blow the base
     
  4. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Agree saw is best even a hand saw will be quicker than a router for chipboard, cut on right side , but will still chip , dec caulk can be used to in join to hide chipping .
     
  5. cdbe

    cdbe

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    Thanks. Should I have said trimming? I'm not familiar with the terminology but I would be cutting to within a few mm with a saw then doing the final bit with the router. This is my router:
    IMG_20181204_091450147.jpg

    My circular saw is an old dog so I'm not convinced it would do a straight cut even with a new blade.
     
  6. foxhole

    foxhole

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    No point trimming , just cut to saw line. Router will still splinter chipboard panels .
     
  7. Yeahaa

    Yeahaa

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    Circular saw to trim within 5 mm of finished size , profile to size with jig & router .
    Least amount of material removed is better easier to profile .

    CNC machines blast it out using a full depth cut , clean as , no chips
    Without investing thousands in CNC or 2 blade panel saws .
    Yes your idea will work , lol one time Howdens sent 12 x 2500 x 600 colour coded mfc panels and told the customer all open bespoke cabinets in the design , the fitter would make onsite ...
     
  8. domdee

    domdee

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    cut using a band new sharp hand saw. just cut the plastic vaneer with a stanley knife and straight edge before hand to avoid chipping it
     
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