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Damp at skirting level (moved from General)

Discussion in 'Building' started by Stattman, 21 May 2016.

  1. Stattman

    Stattman

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    I'm having my lounge redecorated (last done 8/9 years ago). For as long as I can remember there's been some traces of damp pattern near skirting boards, but nothing more problematic than that. My decorator has recommended to have it investigated and fixed - he attaches a higher importance to it than perhaps I have had. The lounge has a concrete floor and is a 1950s semi. The majority of the lounge is fine and although I try to avoid cutting corners was hoping for a pragmatic solution like "damp paint".

    I've attached some photos to get some advice and perhaps how much work is involved. If I'm going to a builder / damp-proof specialist I'd like to be sure that I don't end up paying for more work than what is necessary...

    Many thanks
    Mark

    image.jpeg

    image.jpeg

    image.jpeg
     
  2. foxhole

    foxhole

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    damp-proof specialist= cowboy
    Just needs the source correctly identifying and correcting, looks like a poor seal at the doorway in one pic is the source for that area.
    Are these external walls? Is the exterior ground level below the dpc? Any exterior pics both close up and wide shots.
     
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  4. vinn

    vinn

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    As above.

    You probably dont have a membrane.
    Do you have cavity insulation.
    If the skirtings were to be removed then any contact between the solid floor and the plaster must be broken by 50mm,
    Its often best in minor penetrations to remove the plaster to above the damp signs and then to render in sand and lime.
    When the plaster is off then a few bricks can be taken out to allow you to view the cavity for any bridging of the DPC by cavity rubble.
     
  5. Stattman

    Stattman

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    Thanks for the replies. One wall is a joining the hallway another is external (near the patio door) and the other wall is ajoining next door neighbour (No cavity insulation).

    As its not all over perhaps it's just where some minor breaching has occurred.

    The house is starting to feel a bit like a money-pit, but will probably sound out some advice from a reputable Boulder in terms of "how much?"... Any thoughts of roughly I would expect to pay? Broadly speaking a few hundred vs several hundred...
     
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  7. Footsoldier888

    Footsoldier888

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    I've had this problem and it's a bugger. The problem is some builders are wary of damp because it's a small job with a big hassle factor as you can get more than one cause of damp plus it can be hard to pinpoint. Ofcourse the damp 'specialists' play on this and they will want to inject this and that and will want about three grand off you.

    I think the thing to do is what you are attempting ie try as hard as you can to work out why it might be happening.

    A lot of damp issues boil down to common sense luckily.


    Could there be a leak from the heating system?

    Seeing as its a concrete floor its possible there is no dpm lapping up to your dpc level and the damp is bridging.

    As vinn said maybe the plaster is too low to the floor, allowing the bridge to happen.

    Perhaps get the carpet up and see if there is efforescense on the concrete floor.

    I think your estimate is right if it can be solved without the floor needing replacement.
     
  8. DIYnot Local

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