Damp base of chimney and floor

Joined
15 Nov 2007
Messages
475
Reaction score
140
Location
Manchester
Country
United Kingdom
Helping my Neighbour replace his kitchen.
Removed some units yesterday and found some damp on the wall and floor.

1930s semi
Internal wall that backs onto the chimney breast.
There is damp in the chimney. Salts and paper peeling upstairs on the front of the breast. Some bubbling near the ceiling in the bedroom above the kitchen.

Remove the damaged plaster back to brick but then what? I can plaster well enough for a finish that will be behind units.
Worth using any damp treatment like dry rods? Or pointless given the chimney is leaking? I am guessing that this is the cause of the damp in the kitchen.

Floor looks a lot better today than it did yesterday. Felt wet to the touch yesterday.
Worth lifting the floor boards to check under them? Do the boards need replacing?
I presume the 'concrete' part of the floor in an old hearth.

VERY tight budget.
I will be DIYing what I can for him.

Pics of kitchen wall/floor and upstairs breast.

Thanks
 

Attachments

  • Kitchen 1.jpg
    Kitchen 1.jpg
    107.9 KB · Views: 41
  • Kitchen 2.jpg
    Kitchen 2.jpg
    136.3 KB · Views: 43
  • Kitchen 3.jpg
    Kitchen 3.jpg
    192.2 KB · Views: 35
  • Kitchen 4.jpg
    Kitchen 4.jpg
    179.7 KB · Views: 34
  • Upstairs 2.jpg
    Upstairs 2.jpg
    150.6 KB · Views: 39
Sponsored Links
The 1st and obvious answer is to stop the water that is coming in so the chimney needs fixing before you can then let the walls and floor dry out and scrape back any loose plaster etc before skimming and putting units up. The floor should dry out pretty quickly and unless it is visibly soft or rotten it should be ok.
 
I don't know if he has the budget to fix the chimney. 'New' kitchen is a freebie.
We are attached and had our stack removed a couple of years ago after many attempts to fix.

The damp in the kitchen seems to only be at floor level. More wallpaper to be removed tomorrow.
No sign of damage to the wall or floor units removed.

Don't think not fitting the units will be an option.
Leave the wall as is? Didn't smell nice.
Remove damaged plaster back to brick and leave? Could possibly leave the base units 'loose' for future removal for replastering.
Remove damaged plaster and replaster?
Back to brick and some sort of waterproof barrier/board?

A little frustrating as I would just get any problems fixed and like things done properly.
 
Chop off plaster and batten out the wall, isolating the battens/stud work from the damp. Or fix straight to wall, with similar precautions; most of the cabs and wall units wont be in direct contact with wall. Do likewise with the worktop.

Blup
 
Sponsored Links
I don't know if he has the budget to fix the chimney. 'New' kitchen is a freebie.
We are attached and had our stack removed a couple of years ago after many attempts to fix.

The damp in the kitchen seems to only be at floor level. More wallpaper to be removed tomorrow.
No sign of damage to the wall or floor units removed.

Don't think not fitting the units will be an option.
Leave the wall as is? Didn't smell nice.
Remove damaged plaster back to brick and leave? Could possibly leave the base units 'loose' for future removal for replastering.
Remove damaged plaster and replaster?
Back to brick and some sort of waterproof barrier/board?

A little frustrating as I would just get any problems fixed and like things done properly.
Damp at floor level because gravity makes water fall. Unless chimney is addressed a new kitchen is pointless.
 
Chop off plaster and batten out the wall, isolating the battens/stud work from the damp. Or fix straight to wall, with similar precautions; most of the cabs and wall units wont be in direct contact with wall. Do likewise with the worktop.

Blup
Cheers
Am now thinking plasterboard adhesive foam. This should keep boards isolated from the wall
 
Damp at floor level because gravity makes water fall. Unless chimney is addressed a new kitchen is pointless.

I get that but it is unlikely to happen. I will impress on him the need to get it sorted.
No damage to existing units so will have to make the best of a bad job.
 
Chopped out 2 areas of plaster either side of the hearth 610mm high and 1M wide.
600mm PB to go in leaving a 10mm gap at the bottom.

The floorboards where the wall damp is have rotted areas. Some bits sodden.
I have removed the section of board closest to the wall.
The damp seems to have soaked back 3-4 boards from feeling underneath. They will be coming up today for a better look.

Have done some patching in our house with 22mm chipboard.
Don't think that will be suitable here with the potential for damp so going to use some treated timber.

The joists I could see are a bit wet but don't think rotten. Assuming this is just transfer from wall to board to joist over time.
I have some spare rolls of foil tape and wondering about using it to isolate the new boards from the joist?
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Back
Top