Damp coming through latex floor

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Hi all, we’ve recently moved into a new build. The developer latexed the floor about 4 weeks ago just before we moved in.

No here’s the problem, we had someone come today to measure up for LTV that we want fitted throughout the hallway and kitchen. He done a damp test which was reading between 2-4 all over. The guy said it’s very likely that the developer didn’t put any damp proof on the screws before laying the latex. He’s said we can’t have LVT as it’s very likely the latex will eventually pop due to the damp and will wreck the LVT.

We’re left with 2 options. 1, have sheet vinyl fitted instead or 2, pay to have all the latex removed and start again.

Does anyone know of any other ways we can fix this? For example, can we put damp proof onto the latex and then more latex down?

Thanks in advance.
 

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What latex was used ? Was it a bag & bottle or bag and water mix

what date was the screed laid ?

If you Put vinyl down over a damp floor it will fail just like LVT would.
 
What latex was used ? Was it a bag & bottle or bag and water mix

what date was the screed laid ?

If you Put vinyl down over a damp floor it will fail just like LVT would.

I’m not sure what latex was used tbh. The screed was laid around September last year.
 
The screed should be dry then.
That moisture meter is just a guide. You need to put a hydro box down for 48 hours.
 
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Having spoke to the site manager today, I’ve been informed that no damp proof was put on before the latex as in their opinion the actual damp proof under the floor should be sufficient.

I’ve now had 3 separate fitters in for quotes. Each say they will do it but won’t guarantee the work due to the latex moisture levels being too high. They all want to remove the latex and re do it themselves. This is going to be very costly and cause a lot of mess.

Can anyone tell me why on earth they laid the latex with no damp proofing underneath? Isn’t it standard practice to do this?

We’ve been left with a floor that nobody will lay flooring on that’s guaranteed
 
The sand and cement screed will take approx 6 months to a year to dry enough for LVT. So most floorimg company’s put a moisture suppressant on top of the screed before the latex goes down. By putting it on top of the latex it could fail.

so either take risk , do ceramics, or grind off latex and start again.
 
The sand and cement screed will take approx 6 months to a year to dry enough for LVT. So most floorimg company’s put a moisture suppressant on top of the screed before the latex goes down. By putting it on top of the latex it could fail.

so either take risk , do ceramics, or grind off latex and start again.

The house was completed June last year so it’s had quite a while to dry out. I just can’t understand why they didn’t put something down before the latex. Just laziness really isn’t it.
 
They wouldn’t need to. So not laziness as it won’t need a moisture suppressant.

They should of primed it and then the latex.
 
They wouldn’t need to. So not laziness as it won’t need a moisture suppressant.

They should of primed it and then the latex.

This is what the site manager is saying. I’ve spoken to the company who latexed it and they said they primed it before latexing which I believe. After all, if the latex fails and then wrecks the floor then I’m guessing they’ll be liable for the repairs?

But if that’s the case then why is there still so much moisture in the floor and how do we fix that?
 
It should be below 75%RH if laid September.

you need a proper moisture test doing With this

https://www.f-ball.com/f-talk/article/testing-testing-digital-hygrometer/

A way we used to do a test in the old days was get some visqueen sheet , plastic see through sheet will do.
tape it in the middle of your floor will duck tape and leave down for 24 hours.
Lift it up and if no droplets under it then the screed should be dry.
 
It should be below 75%RH if laid September.

you need a proper moisture test doing With this

https://www.f-ball.com/f-talk/article/testing-testing-digital-hygrometer/

A way we used to do a test in the old days was get some visqueen sheet , plastic see through sheet will do.
tape it in the middle of your floor will duck tape and leave down for 24 hours.
Lift it up and if no droplets under it then the screed should be dry.

Will this method work above latex as well?
 
I’d say yes but it’s not 100% mate.

just get a few quotes in and see what the others do.
 

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