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Early plastic pipe

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by wrs, 13 Feb 2020.

  1. wrs

    wrs

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    Hi All, just been to price a bathroom swap. Hot and cold water pipes are in a dark brown solvent weld pipe, looks slightly larger than 15mm. Never seen in 47 years! Any ideas?
     
  2. The Novice

    The Novice

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    Not a clue, only solvent weld pipe I’ve ever seen was polyorc, which was a dark blue colour?
     
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  3. wrs

    wrs

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    Could have been blue, may have faded. When was polyorc available?
     
    Last edited: 13 Feb 2020
  4. wrs

    wrs

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    Thanks mate, just Googled polyorc, that's the stuff. Looks like philmac is the answer.
     
  5. leakydave

    leakydave

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  6. leakydave

    leakydave

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    This is some 'Hunter' pipe [if I recall correctly]. Very brittle stuff, I would avoid it at all costs. I have suggested to several customers it was all taken out and replaced with copper. In 1970's there was a copper shortage after a trade embargo on Rhodesia so other materials had to be found quickly.
     
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  7. wrs

    wrs

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    I remember using some very poor quality copper in the mid 70s also stainless steel. Didn't see any plastic before Acorn in 79ish
     
  8. Madrab

    Madrab

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    ooohh, that looks like the old durafit that you used to get in some new builds in the early 70's, it was supposed to be a cost effective early plastic pipe system, it's an early ABS/pvc glued water pipel trouble is it's doest age well, if you need to touch it you need to replace it. The other alternative at the time was stainless steel, looks like you drew the short straw. Cut it all out and replace.
     
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  10. Madrab

    Madrab

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  11. The Novice

    The Novice

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  12. SandyLyon

    SandyLyon

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    Some of the old solvent weld plastic becomes so brittle you’d be better off ripping it all out and replacing with copper or Hep2o.
    Once you start disturbing it you can open a real can of worms.

    I recall a whole estate in Runcorn had it all replaced because of problems.
     
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  13. SandyLyon

    SandyLyon

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    Acorn was originally brown (Before it became Hepworth) but was polybutylene and Push Fit, this stuff is more rigid and doesn’t age well.
     
    Last edited: 14 Feb 2020
  14. Terrywookfit

    Terrywookfit

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    Hunter "Genoa" was cream coloured.
     
  15. wrs

    wrs

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    I agree repipe Is the best option. Unfortunately the job is a three storey guest house with pipe starting in the cellar!
    Season starts at Easter. I may swerve this one.
     
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