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Electric vehicle charging

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by ronnie-12, 2 Aug 2021.

  1. ronnie-12

    ronnie-12

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    Hi all, I am wanting a EV charge point installed on my garage, it is detached from the house and I have power run to it already but I wondered if anyone knew what is actually needed to run a 7kw pod, there is SWA running to there, there is no consumer unit in there and my main switch is 100amp and I have a single 100amp fuse in the box outside the garage switch in the main cu has a 16amp mcb at moment, I'm not intending to do the work myself I just wanted a heads up on what is needed
     
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  3. AndyPRK

    AndyPRK

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    The cable to the garage maybe too small.

    does it say 2.5mm. Or 6mm on it ?
     
  4. ericmark

    ericmark

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    There are many units, and it does depend on which is used, but in the main there is some method to monitor the power used by whole house, so the charger can reduce output when the house demand is high. Also the safety devices vary, can use a DC monitor and trip to limit DC to 6 mA and then use a type A RCD, or it may need a type B RCD. Also the earthing system, it may need earth rods, or it may monitor the voltage and auto switch off if outside for the 207 to 253 volt range.

    And that's without talking about cable sizes. Also depends on the car, some need their own system.

    There seems to be the attitude if you can afford an electric car, you can also afford to have an expensive charging unit fitted, daft I know, but your looking at £900 for the unit, and a type B RCD can set you back another £300, there are grants, but the info given does not really help, this house with a 60 amp DNO fuse and TN-C-S supply would be a problem, but with a TT supply and a 100 amp DNO fuse on a small house then much easier. Even whether cooking electric or showing electric can impact on what is required.
     
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