Extending loft hatch in trussed roof

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by arunman, 4 Oct 2007.

  1. arunman

    arunman

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    Hi. I have just bought a house and need to extend the loft hatch so I can get some of my stuff up there. I''ve been looking on here how to extend and cant find any post on how to do it. its a 70's house and has gang nail trusses.

    Is it easy to do or even doable?

    I wont be storing anything heavy up there, I just need bigger access area so I carry stuff over to the one side of the house where the extension is as that bit is boarded and has bigger 6" joists in the loft.
     
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  3. Deluks

    Deluks

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    How far apart are the existing trusses? Does the current hatch cut through any of them or does it go up in between the joists (bottom chords).
     
  4. arunman

    arunman

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    the trusses are 60cm apart (centre) and the existing hatch is between two joists - none are cut.
     
  5. Deluks

    Deluks

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    Well you could probably widen it within the trusses without much fuss. Cutting the truss itself is a no-no without getting it checked out by an engineer, experienced chippie, or the company that made the truss.

    Modern houses are designed to use the lightest trusses that can be got away with, to save weight and timber cost, they can't be played about with like chunky timbers in older properties.
     
  6. arunman

    arunman

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    to make it wider, could I add (bolt or something) another piece, say 6ft, of identical size next to it and then cut about 3ft of the original timber in the middle. I need a few inches of extra space to get my stuff up there.
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    cheers, h
     
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    you can very easily make the hatch longer, by just cutting the plasterboard more between the two existing trusses, then putting trimmers on at each end. Would that be any help?
     
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  9. arunman

    arunman

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    I'm okay with the length, its the width, trying to get a patch cabinet up there and its 60cm x 60cm - just over the current width
     
  10. JohnD

    JohnD

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    ?take the cabinet apart?

    ?Put a new hatch in your cut-roof section which is not made of trusses?
     
  11. MasterAbacus

    MasterAbacus

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    Im asuming your meaning a patch cabinet as in for Data points?

    I had a simlar problem on a job, and i had to find another cabinet.... tried and tried but nothing, so ended up making my own, in sections, using an orig cabinet and some alloy pannels.... Once up in loft space, used rivet gun to put it all together. Far easier than making loft hatch bigger...
     
  12. kidjenson6

    kidjenson6

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  13. Shytalkz

    Shytalkz

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    If it's just one truss that you want to chonk (giving you about 1100 clear width), you can usually get away with it, but it needs purlins and binders to pick it up and transfer load back to the adjacent trusses. You need an SE to take a look at it.
     
  14. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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