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Finish skimming into a wooden corner bead

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by greenc, 7 Mar 2010.

  1. greenc

    greenc

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    Was there a tool a plasterer used to get that near perfect angle when finishing into a traditional wooden corner bead. I have a old cottage and want to keep the original beads although the walls need re-skimming. Previous plasterers i have used never seemed to make a neat job of these beads.
     
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  3. Richard C

    Richard C

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  4. marshman

    marshman

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    Do you mean you want to keep the Quirk, ( the angle cut back into the side of the wood bead).
     
  5. greenc

    greenc

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    Yes i want it to look the same as it was done years ago, Keeping the cut back angle into the bead, this has been the problem. Before re-skimming the rooms if you looked at the edge of the angle, it was a near perfect vertical edge but once over skimmed these edge's were a bit messy. I wondered if they used to use a different type of trowel just for these edges. I hope you understand what i am trying to explain.
     
  6. roughcaster

    roughcaster

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    It's nearly impossible to replicate the original bead quirk with a skim coat using a trowel. It was done with a special cutting tool. The plaster was coated out thickly,, flush to the edge of the bullnosed bead, then the quirk tool cut the small "V" shaped indent, either side of the wooden bead. It's a small metal tool that has a rounded shape to run up the spine of the beading to keep the shape constant, it has a small pointed "beak", that cuts into the plaster. It was done to hide the crack either side of the wood bead, that you will always get between timber and plaster. A skim coat is not thick enough to give a neatly finished quirk. People nowadays tend to square them off using beads,, but i think that neatly done quirks, either side of a nice looking, timber bullnosed beading looks good.
     
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  7. greenc

    greenc

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    Thanks, can you still buy these tools? If so any idea's where.
     
  8. roughcaster

    roughcaster

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    I will find out for you,, promise. I haven't got one myself either, but have seen them in use.
     
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