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Fitting skirting and architrave

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by Keitai, 8 Jul 2021.

  1. Keitai

    Keitai

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    Screenshot_20210708-144538_WhatsApp.jpg Screenshot_20210708-144536_WhatsApp.jpg Screenshot_20210708-144523_WhatsApp.jpg IMG-20210708-WA0002.jpg Got some architrave and skirting to fit. Was gonna buy a dewalt 2nd fix nail gun (as I have dewalt batteries and read good reviews on it) and pin and glue skirting (gripfil for adhesive). Put nails in at slight angle.

    Is it the same for architrave? If the jobs aren't spot on what filler toupret wood filler or caulk?
     

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    Last edited: 8 Jul 2021
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  3. mrrusty

    mrrusty

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    Nailgun for archs? :eek:. I use grab adhesive (usually geocell "the works") and a couple of pins put in with a pin punch where the arch touches the lining to make sure the joint is tight. If the archs are wide, I biscuit the mitres. Caulk up any gap around the edge. Job done.
     
  4. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Foam adhesive on skirting, nothing else required. Hammer and pins for door architrave.
     
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  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Why so shocked? He did say second fix - so 16g or 18g, although unless you are doing loads of them a gun does seem a bit OTT. Most of the guys I know use a 2nd fix nail gun in conjunction with Mitre Mate (or similar) for architraves. No need for any grip adhesive.

    At one time we did this job with very small oval nails and punched under afterwards before filling with linseed putty (painted softwoods) or Brummer stopping (hardwoods). Some guys favoured panel pins with a rampin to set them instead of hammer and oval nails. If using a nailer just put the nails in straight

    OP: You do know about the need to scribe inside corners, don't you? Also, before starting temporarily pin a short piece of architrave to the casing/lining and offer up a small square cut piece of skirting to it just to make sure that the skirting doesn't sit above the architrave. If it will be painted Toupret is fine
     
    Last edited: 8 Jul 2021
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  6. Keitai

    Keitai

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    I guess 2nd fix nail gun can be used on fences too or is that 1st fix one?. Out of interest if I dont buy a nail gun can I hammer them in for skirting and architraves? What length and type of nails should I buy if i do this?

    When you say put architrave next to skirting are you referring to the thickness so that one doesn't stand proud of the other when butted up? Not sure

    I know about scribing internal corners on skirting. Was gonna use either a small toothed bit on jigsaw or coping saw. For external corners use chop saw on 45 degrees then use filler if a bit out. Chopsaw in architraves.

    Use gripfil and pin skirting and just pin architraves.
     
  7. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    2nd fix nailers are for interior work only. The thin nails they fire are too flimsy for timber exposed to wind and weather as well as rotting out quickly when used on treated timbers

    Architraves, something like 1-1/2in bright steel ovals, driven with a 12 to 16oz hammer. Alternatively, in your case (sporadic use) I'd suggest sticking with Foxhole's advice and using low expansion foam - sparingly. Otherwise you need to know what the exact composition of the wall beneath the skirting is, whether or not there are timber wedges in the wall which can be reused, etc. Foam, whilst more expensive, is a lot more idiot proof! Just use it sparingly.

    The architraves pretty much always stand proud or are flush with the skirtings. If not then you either have to pack out the architraves so they sit proud, or you need to terminate both the skirting and the architrave in a plinth block, although TBH I always think they look pretentious in a modern house (in a tall ceilinged Victorian or Edwardian home with high skirtings, however, it is somewhat different)

    PS The bill is in the post...

    PPS How's the blood pressure, Andy?
     
    Last edited: 9 Jul 2021
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  8. Notch7

    Notch7

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    They always seem a bit mock Georgian to me.......often seen in those 1980s executive houses with a portico on the front door supported by fibreglass pillars.
     
  9. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    I know the sort of places you are talking about - my dad bought one, fortunately after I left home home!

    I've made repro plinth blocks with ogee mouldings out on site in the past in Victorian and Edwardian buildings where we were replacing 10in and taller built-up 3- to 5-part skirtings on grounds (in some cases to additionally hide radiator pipework) - and they look thè part there. In my little Victorian artisan's cottage (i.e. another jerry-built hovel for the proles as originally constructed) they looked ghastly. The last owners had, shall we say, peculiar tastes...
     
    Last edited: 9 Jul 2021
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  11. Keitai

    Keitai

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    Looks like newly plastered plasterboard behind skirting I guess. I'll pass on 2nd fix nail gun. A lot of money for something just used on skirting and arcs. Use my hammer. 1st fix will be a better investment. I'll bring gripfill and try and get some of that foam stuff. Idiot proof sounds good
     
  12. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Why do you need GripFill when you have foam? Use one or the other. Used the foam recently on some MF framed walls which were shocking - moved if you touched them, so grip adhesives were out of the question. The foam worked a treat, though
     
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  13. Keitai

    Keitai

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    Ready to go for arcs and skirting. Apparently you leave foam on for 5 mins before pushing onto wall. 20210712_150218.jpg
     
  14. pcaouolte

    pcaouolte

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    FFS is that a blade protector on the coping saw blade? It shows how long it is since I bought a new coping saw, health and safety gone mad (again).
     
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  15. mrrusty

    mrrusty

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    You may find the "wait 5 minutes" a bit long if only using small amounts on smaller sections. OK if using a large amount on e.g. a full sheet of plasterboard as it helps to stop the foam expanding even more and pushing the board outwards, but I think you'll find it skins off too quick in small amounts to get a good stick.

    Also, I do suggest you get a foam gun - that pinkgrip dual flow will work with one. You get MUCH better control for a small bead of foam - I tend to use mine almost shut down to nothing - the basic nozzle is difficult to control - welcome to the black finger tribe :LOL::LOL: - you'll find out after you've done a bit.
     
  16. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    AFAIK that dry foam comes in a can which has a clip to hold the nozzle when not in use - using that clip puts a kink in the flexible nozzle, effectively sealing it (and preventing air from getting at it, causing it to cure). Not seen gun grade low expansion foam in quite a while - standard expanding foam and the newer blue fire foam, yes, but not the low expansion stuff
     
  17. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    But is it? I used to remove the blade from my coping saw when packing it away to stem its' tendency to get hungry and chew on the nearest available wooden tool handle or plastic tool whilst left alone in the back of the van on the way home.
     
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