1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Flooring with joisted UFH

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by gkular, 8 Dec 2018.

  1. gkular

    gkular

    Joined:
    13 Aug 2012
    Messages:
    19
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hertfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi I'm hoping someone can help I'm having a right nightmare.

    I've got a suspended jousted floor. UFH heating guy has placed celotex between the joists and then a dry mix over the pipes. The screed finishes level with the joists.

    Builder has then laid 12mm OSB ( very badly)

    The flooring guy will lay 6mm ply and then vinly flooring on top of this.

    My question is, the 12mm osb , can I lay 18mm instead or will this be too thick as it will have another 6mm ontop.

    In some places there are no joists but solid floor. The builder has had to glue the floor here but not very well and it's a bit bouncy and loose on the edges. How can I secure the floor here, what glue should be used as there are UFH pipes
     
  2. Yeahaa

    Yeahaa

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2018
    Messages:
    66
    Thanks Received:
    4
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Sounds like an ideal situation for 12 mm cement boards screwed to joists & layed on a system adhesive over concrete ?
    Moreso if you plan to scrap the OSB.
     
  3. gkular

    gkular

    Joined:
    13 Aug 2012
    Messages:
    19
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hertfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi thanks, are the cement boards good for under floor heating? Better than ply or OSB?
     
  4. Yeahaa

    Yeahaa

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2018
    Messages:
    66
    Thanks Received:
    4
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes is effectively a dry cement screed .
     
  5. Madrab

    Madrab

    Joined:
    4 Oct 2012
    Messages:
    5,139
    Thanks Received:
    1,255
    Location:
    East Renfrewshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Also .... they usually have a much lower thermal resistance and higher thermal conductivity than wood and are normally water proof
     
  6. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page