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Flooring woodworm

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by LydiaEdwardianHouse, 3 Jan 2021.

  1. LydiaEdwardianHouse

    LydiaEdwardianHouse

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    We recently purchased a three bed semi. The floorboards in the hallway are in terrible condition - the previous owners lifted the carpet 20 odd years ago and haven’t looked after them properly.

    the survey said the hallway has suffered historic woodworm (see pics). Do you think any can be salvaged by sanding back down? Clearly those with big holes need replacing entirely.
     

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  3. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    Has the wood worm been eradicated?

    You would be best replacing for new, could salvage them by turning them upside down, but I couldn't say about the structural integrity.

    Whilst the boards are up I'd take a good look at the floor joists also.
     
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  4. JohnD

    JohnD

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    it's just square-edge. I'd replace with new, they're nothing special and in poor condition. I like to screw floorboards, rather than nailing them. There are probably electrical cables and a water pipe underneath, which one day you will need to access.

    Clean out the void under the floor, and any airbricks you find, and treat the joists for worm, after brushing or washing them clean. You can put mineral wool loft insulation between the joists, stuffing it tightly at the ends against the walls, as this is where draughts and dirt blow in. Do not obstruct airflow from the airbricks. Bare floorboards are very cold, and this is mostly due to draughts. lag the pipes. If you see any traces of damp, especially affecting the joist ends, photograph it and come back.

    In some cases, the ends of the joists stand on a dwarf wall just inside the exterior house wall, with a gap which is supposed to be an air space preventing damp, but usually full of damp builders rubbish, sand and mortar. If so, clean it out by scraping, raking, and with the pipe on your builder's canister vac.
     
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