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Franke Olympus Mono Mixer Kitchen Tap

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Roger465, 11 Nov 2019.

  1. Roger465

    Roger465

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    I have one of these (or very similar) in my kitchen, and the valve on the cold side is leaking. Unfortunately, I can't figure how to remove it for replacement. There's a tiny hole on the under surface of each tap handle, which presumably contains a screw, but it's pretty inaccessible.

    I was hoping to get lucky, and poked various sizes of Allen key in, working blind of course, but none of them catch, so I guess it's a screw. Can't get a screwdriver anywhere near it, as there's only like a 3" gap between the bottom of the handles and the sink - and yes, when I turn the tap on (¼ turn) the little hole is still inaccessible, this time because of the splashback :mad:

    It's a really nice tap, which was expensive in its time I think, so it'd be a pity to replace the whole thing - I prefer fixing things :rolleyes:

    Anybody happen to know if it's a Philips or slotted screw or what? I might be able to get a little short screwdriver if I knew...

    upload_2019-11-11_16-14-6.png
     
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  3. Djangobanjo

    Djangobanjo

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    I think this is the tap I had - was def a Franke and looked like that. Valve was leaking too. Sure it was an allen key under the handle.
    Once I got the handle off, I couldn't get the valve out though. A plumber friend came round and had a go and also couldn't get it out. He tried to drill it out but we gave up and bought a new tap.

    I was really annoyed, as I was told Franke were great and offered free parts for life too - I got the replacement valve for free, just couldn't fit it!
     
    Last edited: 11 Nov 2019
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  4. oldbuffer

    oldbuffer

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    1. I'm pretty sure its an Allen key. They are usually 2.5 mm or 3 mm.
    2. If it does require a screwdriver, consider slackening the securing nut underneath. Provides you have flexis attaching to the water pipework you my have enough wriggle room to get a screwdriver on it. Try to avoid removing the scuring nut entirely because they are fiddly to refit, but not impossible.
     
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  5. Roger465

    Roger465

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    Tried and tried to poke 2, 2½ and 3mm Allen keys in from underneath, but they really don’t seem to engage with anything :mad:

    Sadly the tap isn't mounted on flexible hoses either – straight copper pipe – so I can’t fiddle too much with it.

    Oh well – getting a new worktop soon, so the sink will have to come out then, and I’ll get a proper look.

    Trouble is, there are so many variants of these little valves, which look ALMOST the same – and so many variants of Franke taps too (I’m now thinking mine is an Eiger rather than Olympus maybe) it can be hard to be sure you’re buying the right one :(
     
  6. Roger465

    Roger465

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    Don’t think anybody on this thread has followed any of my other disasters… if something can go wrong it will… anyway, the reason no Allen key would fit is that the grub screws are absolutely TINY and this one had already dropped out :eek:

    Fortunately I was able to retrieve it, and have got the handles off with a rubber mallet :D

    PS 2mm Allen key

    20191111_181316.jpg
     
  7. ajsdoc

    ajsdoc

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    I had this tap, replaced cartridges 3 times! Each one lasted only a year or so.

    I binned it and put a new old fashioned screwdown tap (with old fashioned rubber washers) for not much more than the cost of a replacement cartridge!

    Wish I'd done it straight away. I'm unconvinced about these quarter turn taps!
     
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  8. Roger465

    Roger465

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    Have now removed the valves - with some difficulty. In the unlikely event anybody else is doing this, you have to ry and separate the valves from the big brass bushes, or buy them too - and the economics start to look more questionable. But I managed it, and am now soaking all the parts in Kilrock to get 25 years' worth of limescale off.

    Then I'll order a couple of valves, and hopefully get it all shiny and leak-free. As the RRP of this tap is over £200, I think it's worth it ;)
     
  9. Roger465

    Roger465

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    GAAAAHHHH!!!!! Don't tell me that!

    Well, I guess maybe there's something about quality of replacement parts or something, as the originals have lasted over 20 years... hope the cartridges I buy are better than yours :eek::eek::eek:
     
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  11. ajsdoc

    ajsdoc

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    I bought my replacement cartridges from Franke!

    I'm always going to try and get taps with rubber washers from now on, the number of people I hear of trying to source cartridges, struggling with unknown taps, etc etc. It's so wasteful, when the previous system lasted for years and required the relatively easy replacement of a rubber washer costing a few pence!

    Think the taps in my Gran's house lasted nearly a lifetime!
     
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  12. ReJect

    ReJect

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    Hi Rodger,
    I have repaired lots of Franke taps including your type.
    If you need any parts you can try Central Services online for exact mixer tap identification and parts.
    Each cartridge (there is a hot and cold) costs about £20.
    The Olympus tap is about £200 but can be sourced for £150 or have seen it at as low as £120
     
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  13. echoes

    echoes

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  14. Djangobanjo

    Djangobanjo

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    I replaced my Franke tap with a £16 one from amazon, but I was moving house so not too fussed.

    No idea of current brand tap - came with the sink from Benchmarx, seem OK so far, but only one year in.
     
  15. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    I've found with the quarter-turn taps that the ceramic parts have a long life and the cause of leakage is the rubber seal at the base losing its resilience with age. I cut replacement seals from 4mm sheet neoprene rubber, as shop-bought seals of the right diameter are usually hard to find. It's a great pity that the cartridges aren't a standard size from one tap model/manufacturer to another.
     
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  16. ReJect

    ReJect

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    Yes it is often the rubber seal failing to maintain the pressure on the works of the cartridge.
    Also can be an O ring which fits into a brass washer, which some of the works have.
    This might explain why high pressure mains seems to be usually the side that drips first
     
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  17. Roger465

    Roger465

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    Job done. Although it’s kind of in my nature to repair rather than replace things (hate our throw-away society), sometimes I doubt the wisdom. The tap handles were quite corroded where they join the tap body – that’s mostly hidden when they’re in place, thankfully – and the internal splines which slide onto the tap spindle, so they just turn round and round…

    Fortunately, the grub screws seems to hold the handles pretty firmly in place. New handles cost more than it would be worth, and the leak has completely stopped now (though I note the earlier comment that it may only have been the rubber seals in the first place :mad:)… anyway, it cost me less than £20 to do the job, so it’s worth a punt. If it starts leaking again, I’ll chuck the whole unit.

    Thanks as always for your kind help and advice :D

    Roger
     
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