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Garage Studwork / Insulating Ceiling

Discussion in 'Building' started by garuff, 23 Oct 2020.

  1. garuff

    garuff

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    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi
    I have a c.5.6m x 5.4m double garage (double up and over door, pitched/trussed roof) that I'm looking to make warmer, but have a couple of bits I'm not sure on...

    My plan is in two parts
    1) erect a stud wall splitting the garage in half side to side leaving two c.2.7m x 5.6m sections (it's actually larger on one side as I'll go as close to the up and over as I can)

    2) plasterboard the ceiling insulate over the top.

    I'm not looking for a habitable space, just hold the temp up better and make it more comfortable working in the workshop (one half of the split)

    My questions are:
    Studwork - I've actually already put a bit up as it was forming a divider to hang stuff off, but I just threw up 38*63 CLS. Is this alright to continue across the garage and form into a full blown wall? The ceiling height is about 2.7m.
    Anything I'm reading on Studwork is talking about 75 or 100mm x 50mm sawn timber, but then is that even actually that size?!

    Electrics along the trusses - there are various cables for sockets/lights clipped along the edges of the trusses, if I'm going to be insulating between the trusses, should I be moving the cables so they're not 'insulated'? I have a feeling it's bad practice to chuck insulation over cabling.

    Any input appreciated.
    Thanks
     
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  3. endecotp

    endecotp

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    Insulation is equally good at retaining cold as at retaining heat.
    If you want the workshop to be warmer you need some heating, as well as insulation.

    Generally, it’s OK to have insulation over lighting cables because the current is low, but you need to check for socket cables. They may be OK if they are secured in contact with the wood, and/or in contact with plasterboard, with insulation just on one side. Ask in “Electrics” for a proper answer.

    You mustn’t have polystyrene insulation in contact with cables as it reacts with the PVC.
     
  4. garuff

    garuff

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    Location:
    Northamptonshire
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    Thank you - am looking at rockwool rolls rather than polystyrene etc. Will pop over there to dig further.

    Heating definitely a consideration, not quite got into the weeds for it yet, but vague thoughts around seeing what impact an oil filled electric rad on a WiFi switch has (i.e. can switch it on a bit before going out, or regular intervals etc)
     
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