gas water heaters

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by JulianP, 3 Dec 2013.

  1. JulianP

    JulianP

    Joined:
    1 Dec 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Thanks Received:
    16
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi to all as this is my first post on the forum.

    My wife has inherited her grand parent's (deceased) house recently. It's a very solidly built (probably) 50's built 3 bed semi.

    It's in a time warp and needs a new kitchen and either central heating or maybe storage heaters fitting as it has nothing at present. The old folks relied on a gas fire in the living room and the electric heaters in other rooms

    My question revolves around the water heating. In the airing cupboard is a standard copper tank without an electric immersion fitting, and by its side is a gas burner device that obviously heats and circulated the water to the tank. It has a flue that goes straight up into the loft space, and presumably out via the roof. It looks like an antique to me, what do the gas fitters think, is it a bloomin danger that will probably likely set the place on fire or boil the water up one day when people are out or are they OK? The other issue I guess is that spares will not be available. We plan on renting out the property in the future as no buyers have expressed interest as yet.

    Julian
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. gas112

    gas112

    Joined:
    27 Oct 2009
    Messages:
    23,138
    Thanks Received:
    8,266
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Few younger gas guys will ever have seen a circulator even in there day they were not very popular.
    Spares definetly not avialable as not been made for around 25 years.
    Needs a air vent directly to outside from the cupboard or cupboard doors vented then a vent to outside in that room .

    There was various thermostatic protection on models but yes it could boil over if these failed , Fire only under extreme circumstances or someone put stuff too close in cupboard

    Rented out property i personally would get it disconnected and removed as not worth the risk at the age it is .
     
  4. JulianP

    JulianP

    Joined:
    1 Dec 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Thanks Received:
    16
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks Gas, that was practically the reply I was expecting to hear. Basically it's to go in a skip!

    So the next question now looms: We have a choice of gas or electricity for heating/hot water.

    I think the economy seven convectors and large DHW tank are pretty good these days, but I wonder if it would put off potential purchasers as the average bod just equates electricity with expensive and probably can't quite understand the workings of the economy 7 tariff?

    So onto gas, I'm really not a fan of combi boilers as I just see needless complication and the inevitable breakdowns and expense. Has the combi boiler got reliable of late or not? Conventional boilers are probably more reliable, but am I correct to think that they're not allowed as replacements nowadays and condensing types must be fitted?

    So basically, what would people do if starting off with a clean sheet in an old three bed semi? I'm not after fancy 'bells & whistles' cobblers, just basic heating and hot water to make the house more saleable and/or attractive to tenants.

    Cheers Julian.
     
  5. Whitespirit66

    Whitespirit66

    Joined:
    15 Dec 2007
    Messages:
    8,012
    Thanks Received:
    755
    Location:
    Bristol
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I would forget the E7 storage heaters. They are expensive to run, bulky and offer poor control. Maybe modern ones are better, but when I lived in a flat with them, they were cooling down late afternoon/evening just when you wanted the heat. If gas is available, it's always preferable to electric. Tenants will almost always feel the same.

    If you don't like combis, you can have a heat only boiler and stored hw in a new hw cylinder. Whether you have heat only or a combi, they are all condensing these days.

    Also, a few snaps of that circulator would be good. ;)
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  6. JulianP

    JulianP

    Joined:
    1 Dec 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Thanks Received:
    16
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    That's the way forward I think, heat only and a new storage tank with immersion that's invaluable if the boiler packs up. Conventional motorised valves etc.

    One thing with the gas option is the requirement for an annual safety check thing, which as a landlord is an additional cost, but probably not that much in the overall scheme.

    I'll try and take a few pictures of the circulator next time I'm there.

    Julian
     
  7. Madrab

    Madrab

    Joined:
    4 Oct 2012
    Messages:
    8,579
    Thanks Received:
    2,486
    Location:
    East Renfrewshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Couldn't agree more...just replaced my elderly mothers storage heaters, new house for her and they were replaced 3 years ago but so inadequate in control and cooled down in early evening when she really needed heat, such a waste of money. 2 new thermo ceramic rads and economy 10, so much better and cheaper!!
     
  8. Sponsored Links
  9. JulianP

    JulianP

    Joined:
    1 Dec 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Thanks Received:
    16
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Here's a couple as promised :)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Julian
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  10. dcawkwell

    dcawkwell

    Joined:
    2 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    3,422
    Thanks Received:
    516
    Location:
    Humberside
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    no messing . modern combi with radiator complete system in for about £3000
     
  11. Whitespirit66

    Whitespirit66

    Joined:
    15 Dec 2007
    Messages:
    8,012
    Thanks Received:
    755
    Location:
    Bristol
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks Julian. I've heard of them, but never actually seen one installed. Looks like an extremely simple bit of kit. Not much to go wrong.
     
  12. FiremanT

    FiremanT

    Joined:
    16 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    9,536
    Thanks Received:
    1,916
    Location:
    Uk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
     
  13. JulianP

    JulianP

    Joined:
    1 Dec 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Thanks Received:
    16
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Indeed, they look really simple. I've no idea how they work but there doesn't appear to be room for a conventional 'gas valve' as you would find on a conventional boiler. Maybe there's just a pilot light and a bi-metal strip controlling gas flow to the burner, some sort of flame failure device too I expect? No mains power to it by the look of things.

    Julian
     
  14. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page