How to connect four tellys to a satellite

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Hi guys,

I just wanted to know whether this will work.

There is a co-axial cable coming down the side of the house and in through the wall. The co-axial will feed into a two way splitter, one end will feed a television, and the other will connect 3-4metres of co-axial which will feed into a 4 way splitter. This here http://www.screwfix.com/p/4-way-splitter-with-powerpass-all-ports/69265

The four way splitter will feed four televisions, making five in total. I want to know, will this work?

I don't have a television to test the cable itself, and will there be any lose in quality?
 
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it might work for terrestrial television (freeview); it will not work for satellite reception.

Every box or TV with integrated satellite receiver needs its own connection to the satellite dish LNB (if you have more than 4 receivers you will need a multiswitch or an octo LNB)
 
Let's get this straight. You want to connect five Freesat TVs to one dish? It won't work. For starters you'll need a quad LNB, connect the outputs to a switcher unit, from there to the TVs.

EDIT: OwainDIYer, you beat me to it!
 
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it might work for terrestrial television (freeview); it will not work for satellite reception.

Every box or TV with integrated satellite receiver needs its own connection to the satellite dish LNB (if you have more than 4 receivers you will need a multiswitch or an octo LNB)

Can you explain? Why will it MIGHT work? Reviews of the splitter seem to be good, as one or two mention they have done what I plan to do

I've no interest in a subscription service as there is cable in the area so am fine with just freeview. Why will it MIGHT work ?
 
Let's get this straight. You want to connect five Freesat TVs to one dish? It won't work. For starters you'll need a quad LNB, connect the outputs to a switcher unit, from there to the TVs.

EDIT: OwainDIYer, you beat me to it!

Why won't the splitter work? Can you link me an example of a switcher unit, I'm not understanding you
 
The best you can hope for with that setup is :-

A single satellite cable into a Satellite Reciever, then using the COAX OUT feed that into a splitter that runs to the other TV's

This means whatever channel is on the sat box, can be viewed on another TV.
 
The best you can hope for with that setup is :-

A single satellite cable into a Satellite Reciever, then using the COAX OUT feed that into a splitter that runs to the other TV's

This means whatever channel is on the sat box, can be viewed on another TV.

Why can't the splitter work off the main feed? Isn't that how it's supposed to work ?
 
Confusion reigns supreme.

Correct the box will not work with satellite, such as SKY or Freesat, but Freeview is delivered via an aerial so there should be no problem feeding the aerial into an amplifier/splitter to feed more than a single TV set.

Splitter without an amplifier will supply insufficient signal to each set.
 
So what amplifier do I get that doesn't need power to run?

Also I have a bell box on the wall inside the house, one end has broadband and the other has tv. Can I hook up all the tvs to the eurobell box instead of the dish?
 
A Eurobell cable box will be at least 14 years old and well overdue for replacement even if it's still working.

Could you confirm whether your co-axial cable through the wall is connected to
- a TV aerial
- a satellite dish
- or is a cable TV feed (probably coming in from the front pavement)
 
A Eurobell cable box will be at least 14 years old and well overdue for replacement even if it's still working.

Could you confirm whether your co-axial cable through the wall is connected to
- a TV aerial
- a satellite dish
- or is a cable TV feed (probably coming in from the front pavement)

The coaxial is connect to a tv aerial.

Entirely separate to that is an incoming cable to eurobell, but after i opened it i noticed there is no socket for a tv just the broadband. I assume you have to pay for them to come and fit that
 
The reason why a coax splitter won't work with a satellite feed is twofold. First, you need four satellite receivers if you want a different picture on 4 TVs. Second, each satellite box needs a direct feed from the dish because of the way satellite signals work.

The channels are split in to four groups relating to the the way the signal is beamed down. This means that the satellite LNB on the end of the dish arm is switched between four modes; one per channel group (HL, HH, VL, VH). If you split the satellite signal cable two or more ways then sooner or later two boxes will need to be on different channel groups at the same time. One satellite LNB can't be in two different receiving states at the same time.

Sky's solution was to move to an LNB with 4 outputs. A recording Sky box takes two feeds. Each feed drives one LNB out of the four on the dish arm. This way there's no clash. That's why you see a lot of satellite dishes with two wires connected. The house has a recording box or two boxes that just show live signals.

As already mentioned, you can have one satellite receiver and split the output signal to feed more than one TV. I'll be doing exactly this in a commercial install later in the week. Two older TVs will use the RF outputs. Two new flat panel TVs and a projector will share the HDMI output. They'll all show the same signal, so all will have a window on to the main channel being viewed. In this case that's fine because it's exactly what's required.

Cable TV works in a very similar way to satellite.

Freeview via your TV aerial is the exception, and it's what most people are familiar with and how they first start with the hardware for splitting signals.

The reason that Freeview works through a splitter is because the aerial signal contains all the different channel groups, so it's easy to hop between channels. Second, the tuning apparatus is contained in each TV so there's no need for outboard tuners.


If your main TV feed is via satellite, and you don't want to buy an extra three satellite receivers (or pay for the extra subscriptions), then really the only way to split the signal between four TVs is to take the signal after the satellite box has decoded it and then send the same picture to all the TVs. An aerial splitter will work for this. Depending on the cable lengths involved and the quality of cable (which is more important than people realise until too late), then either an amplified splitter LINK or a passive splitter LINK can be used.

A passive splitter is a few pounds cheaper, but it does need a much more powerful signal from the Sky box RF out to survive first the splitting process and then the losses down the cables to the TVs. A safer bet is an amplified splitter. Here there's very little loss in signal strength. It might be £20 or £25 as opposed to £10 or £15, but you won't waste time and money because the signal is too weak. It'll just work.
 
Thanks very much indeed. As I'm only concerned with telly being able to receive basic analogue through a tv aerial I'll try the passive splitter box approach and then if there's a problem I can also make amendments. I ran all the cable prior to this and they are conveniently located so can be changed if necessary. Only concern now is the strength of signal, I've no telly to test it with at the moment.

With regards to satellite thanks so much for the information. I don't have a satellite dish anyway so don't need to worry with this at the moment, and no intention of getting cable tv either. Lucid very very helpful indeed :D
 

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