Insulating single skin utility room

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Bristol
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Hi, we have an absolutely freezing attached utility room which we would like to insulate to make it more pleasant and economical to heat in the winter months.

It is approx 9m x 1.9m internally. Outside is rendered. It has an internal manhole with a sealed/tiled cover (near the front doors), sink and washing machine, front upvc doors, an internal access door into the house kitchen (which was a conservatory, now is a 2022 extension), and french doors to the rear garden. The roof has a fair bit of loft roll insulation (no access but could see this when the roof was opened up to re-tile last year). There is a double radiator connected to the house combi. It’s all plasterboarded up and fitted with kitchen units (see pic).

Plans from 2002 state the walls were built with single 100mm block work, except the wall adjoining the kitchen which has a cavity with 85mm rockwool (I have seen this confirmed when the extension was built).

The tiled floor is (was) continuous with the now replaced old kitchen conservatory (same tiles so presume same underneath): nominally a 100mm screed on concrete, but this was variable in the extension 100 to 30mm due to the slab level being a bit iffy.

My questions:
1. Insulating internal walls is presumably relatively simple ? Remove plasterboard, 100mm PIR between the block work piers? Given the width of the room I don’t want to lose any space , so minimal or zero second layer of PIR over the top to inculcate the piers?
2. Is there a cost/benefit discussion to be had about whether removing the tiles and screed and installing a floating PIR floor is worth it? From the experience in the conservatory we would only be able to fit between 20 to 75mm in order to maintain the floor level. There is also the question of disturbing the manhole cover.

Any advice would be very much appreciated.
 

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Hi, we have an absolutely freezing attached utility room which we would like to insulate to make it more pleasant and economical to heat in the winter months.

It is approx 9m x 1.9m internally. Outside is rendered. It has an internal manhole with a sealed/tiled cover (near the front doors), sink and washing machine, front upvc doors, an internal access door into the house kitchen (which was a conservatory, now is a 2022 extension), and french doors to the rear garden. The roof has a fair bit of loft roll insulation (no access but could see this when the roof was opened up to re-tile last year). There is a double radiator connected to the house combi. It’s all plasterboarded up and fitted with kitchen units (see pic).

Plans from 2002 state the walls were built with single 100mm block work, except the wall adjoining the kitchen which has a cavity with 85mm rockwool (I have seen this confirmed when the extension was built).

The tiled floor is (was) continuous with the now replaced old kitchen conservatory (same tiles so presume same underneath): nominally a 100mm screed on concrete, but this was variable in the extension 100 to 30mm due to the slab level being a bit iffy.

My questions:
1. Insulating internal walls is presumably relatively simple ? Remove plasterboard, 100mm PIR between the block work piers? Given the width of the room I don’t want to lose any space , so minimal or zero second layer of PIR over the top to inculcate the piers?
2. Is there a cost/benefit discussion to be had about whether removing the tiles and screed and installing a floating PIR floor is worth it? From the experience in the conservatory we would only be able to fit between 20 to 75mm in order to maintain the floor level. There is also the question of disturbing the manhole cover.

Any advice would be very much appreciated.
You would need continuity of insulation across the piers in order to alleviate cold spot condensation forming. The floor issue will likely be overlooked in favour of thermal gains v's cost/disturbance.
Is the I.C. cover a double seal, screw-down fella?
 
yes it is is sealed. I’ve never opened it up.

So in order of least to most disruptive, the options are:

1. Leave tiles in situ, just insulate external walls
2. Remove tiles, SLC, then fit vinyl tile floor to match kitchen
2. Remove tiles, remove screed and fit floating chipboard floor with as much insulation as possible

Would 2 and 3 be problematic with that manhole cover?
 

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Hi, back again considering how to achieve this insulation project.

I have removed a few pieces of plasterboard near the front doors and unlike the plans suggest (see first post), the wall does not appear to be typical garage construction, single skin breeze block with piers. From the pics and wall thickness does it look like the current wall makeup is plasterboard dot n dab/render scratch coat/double skin (with cavity?)/render?

This seems to severely restrict the amount of insulation I can squeeze in there as the original plan was to put 100mm pir boards between the piers - the room is currently 1.9m wide.

A better new plan to maximise internal space might be insulated pb straight over the top of existing pb. Is it even worth doing this with 25mm or is 50mm minimum improvement I would notice?




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