Internal door, fancy glass panel glass broken

M

Mickymoody

As it says above, I have the porch door, with two panels of fancy glass, that is textured, and the door looks old, so maybe origional to the house, circa 1890's?

How would I go on for replacing one panel to match the other panel?

I can't initially go to a glazier and say fix it, as they don't know what the pattern is, so would incur a callout charge just to look? The design is curved at the top, so would expect to be a nightmare to fit, and the beading is nailed in, so would be a nightmare DIY job. Hammers, nails, and glass for me don't mix. I invented L shaped nails, and dead black thumbs.

But as the door seems origional to the house, I wouldn't want to bin it, but expect that it may be more expensive to repair rather than replace?

Also, I love retro, and hate to bin anything, and always fix everything.

Any advice?
 
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why not email glass restoration companies pictures of the door and the glass, and just ask them if they can repair/match the glass and a cost?
 
M

Mickymoody

Can you you take a photo of the glass?

Although I love tech, every camera I have has died, but I suppose that is a way forward..put new batteries in my Canon A30 powershot, it immediately says batteries dead. Mobile phone no resolution.

Digital cameras = uninventing photography.

There is also the issue of the textured glass, that would not be captured by a photograph. I would if I could, would be much help..sorry people!

No other ideas? Seems like a dead end...
 
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M

Mickymoody

How would I go on for replacing one panel to match the other panel?

But as the door seems origional to the house, I wouldn't want to bin it, but expect that it may be more expensive to repair rather than replace?

How about breaking the other panel so that a glazing company can replace with 2 identical panes of a design of your choice? No need for bespoke ordering/matching and you get to keep the original door that you don't want to bin! Win win situation.

That's probably the best idea, thanks Bob, however, I just thought, if I could remove the beading on the broken glass, as much is still there, and remove it without breaking it, as the beading is nailed in, then remove the good glass, as the experience of removing the broken glass would teach me what not to do, then take the glass to a glazier, where it can then be measured accurately, and matched?

As I said earlier, the glass is textured, so a photograph would not be a true reflection of the glass. And the only way of taking a picture would be to use a throw away camera, send it off to be processed, then get the prints back, then scan them in, then post then. So people that make idiotic posts. Think.

So next up - how to remove those tiny nails? Without breaking the glass? I've used a claw hammer for large nails, I suspect some specialised tool is required? If the beading is damaged on nail removal, is new beading available to buy? Who sells it?

I sound like a dunce about this - I know. Everything DIY I do goes wrong. But I was once called to the Barclaycard HQ in Bootle, to repair a faulty modem, that had failed, and so ALL the ATM's in the Southwest of the UK were out of action. I was there in under 30 minutes. Fixed in 5.

Repairing computers good, repairing glass bad.
 
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As I said earlier, the glass is textured, so a photograph would not be a true reflection of the glass. And the only way of taking a picture would be to use a throw away camera, send it off to be processed, then get the prints back, then scan them in, then post then. So people that make idiotic posts. Think.

[/quote]what on earth are you talking about? Are you Marty McFly trapped in 1955?

and why was my other post deleted?

I know i'm having a bit of a laugh but come on!!!
 
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As I said earlier, the glass is textured, so a photograph would not be a true reflection of the glass. And the only way of taking a picture would be to use a throw away camera, send it off to be processed, then get the prints back, then scan them in, then post then. So people that make idiotic posts. Think.
what on earth are you talking about? Are you Marty McFly trapped in 1955?

and why was my other post deleted?

I know i'm having a bit of a laugh but come on!!![/quote]
Yea so was mine, the mods on here really do need a reality check and grow some, mods you've surpassed yourselves again, pathetic! :evil:
 
M

Mickymoody

As I said earlier, the glass is textured, so a photograph would not be a true reflection of the glass. And the only way of taking a picture would be to use a throw away camera, send it off to be processed, then get the prints back, then scan them in, then post then. So people that make idiotic posts. Think.
what on earth are you talking about? Are you Marty McFly trapped in 1955?

and why was my other post deleted?

I know i'm having a bit of a laugh but come on!!![/quote]

I don't know of any posts being deleted, but the one that stated 'My digital camera does not work', must have passed you by? Try posting on-topic, and not slagging people off, then you may find that your posts don't get deleted? Oops sorry. You were unable to, and did it again. Mybad.

Are you Mr Magoo, and unable to read properly?

I know I'm having a laugh, but at you!
 
C

cantaloup63

Could you ask a neighbour to maybe take a photo with a digital camera and email it to you?.
 
C

cantaloup63

Well the only other thing that springs to mind which may be impractical would be to unscrew the door and take it to a glazier. Depends if this leaves your house unsecured or not.

If it is circa 1890 then it will probably be nigh on impossible to get a perfect match anyway, but at least you'd be able to see a few possible alternatives whilst in the shop and leave the door there for them to deal with and fix for you, which might be cheaper than them doing a call out repair.

Sorry if this isn't an attractive solution, but it's the only one that springs to mind
 
M

Mickymoody

Well the only other thing that springs to mind which may be impractical would be to unscrew the door and take it to a glazier. Depends if this leaves your house unsecured or not.

If it is circa 1890 then it will probably be nigh on impossible to get a perfect match anyway, but at least you'd be able to see a few possible alternatives whilst in the shop and leave the door there for them to deal with.

Sorry if this isn't an attractive solution, but it's the only one that springs to mind

That is an idea out of the box fella, and I like it. You think out the box, and I like it. That's what I do.

But nobody posted about removing those little pin nails, with no heads, or how to replace the beading, hammering those same nails back in, without breaking the new glass? Surely someone must know?

I set a challenge down....just for fun; can anyone take a picture of a window, at close range, capturing detail, ie raindrops, on their camera phone/iphone/whatever? I think it's impossible. And in low light. Dr Alarm is permitted to respond, but not talk. His talking grates. No talk Dr Alarm.
 
C

cantaloup63

Run a blade around the beading to break the paintwork on the timber side as well as the glass. Thin blade/chisel to prise up one bead which if you tap down may leave enough of a pin-head exposed to pull with pliers of some description, although you may well have to accept that at least one bead will be broken in half. Once the first one is out, the others can be levered out with a chisel or thin blade to prevent too much damage.

The glass will need very careful and slow removal by scaring any paint on the remaining side and/or any putty exposed from the removed bead. Not easy and expect further breakage.

Replacement is the reverse, but use a bradawl to help nail those pins a mm below the timber surface before making good with caulk/paint
 
A

Alarm

2 lux with flash
Leaded Light Cupboard door, sprayed with glass cleaner.

2luxwithflashonleadedgl.jpg
[/URL]

Note the polished edges.
 

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