Is this okay? Kitchen Isolation Grid Plate Diagram

Joined
15 Jul 2018
Messages
199
Reaction score
8
Country
United Kingdom
My sparky has suggested the following wiring diagram for the kitchen.

The grid plate would be housed next to the fusebox under the stairs in the kitchen.

Each radial (red arrow) will run to an unswitched socket behind the integrated appliance.

I asked him whether each grid switch would require an FCU as it is a radial 2.5mm cable to each socket which he replied no as the appliances plug would have the appropriate fuse for protection.

Is this okay? Thoughts?

Kitchen Grid Plate.jpg
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
10,358
Reaction score
2,117
Location
Poole, Dorset
Country
United Kingdom
no as the appliances plug would have the appropriate fuse for protection.
That is correct.

However this entire arrangement of switches for each outlet is totally unnecessary.
Placing the switches next to the consumer unit (hopefully not a fusebox) will put most of the load at one end of the ring, which could overload the cable between the consumer unit and switches.
Are there really only 2 other outlets for the rest of the kitchen?

Overall a very poor design.
 
Joined
15 Jul 2018
Messages
199
Reaction score
8
Country
United Kingdom
That is correct.

However this entire arrangement of switches for each outlet is totally unnecessary.
Placing the switches next to the consumer unit (hopefully not a fusebox) will put most of the load at one end of the ring, which could overload the cable between the consumer unit and switches.
Are there really only 2 other outlets for the rest of the kitchen?

Overall a very poor design.


No there are about five but I put two for simplicity.

Why do you think the design is poor?
 
Joined
20 Aug 2009
Messages
9,273
Reaction score
1,187
Location
Dorset
Country
United Kingdom
I'm not sure you mean by overloading one end of the ring. If it is a ring, there is no end, as it's fed from both ways.

Would you rather 4mm2 cable was used? This could be considered overkill on a ring, though can be used as a radial.

Harder though not impossible to fit the switch terminals.

I would say this arrangement is acceptable, though isn't there guidance that the number of spurs shouldn't exceed the number of accessories directly on the ring? This is a deliberately pedantic comment NOT intended to create pages and pages of drivel.
 
Joined
20 Aug 2009
Messages
9,273
Reaction score
1,187
Location
Dorset
Country
United Kingdom
Why are they unnecessary switches?

They seem very convenient switches to me.
 
Joined
15 Jul 2018
Messages
199
Reaction score
8
Country
United Kingdom
Why? Do you want all those unnecessary switches?

One wall of the kitchen is completely units from floor to ceiling which is where the majority of the appliances are going.
I'm not sure how else I would be able to turn an appliance off without pulling the appliance out to switch it off..
 
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
38,284
Reaction score
4,630
Location
Retired to:
Country
Portugal
Most have knobs or the modern equivalent.

Convenient for what? They are unnecessary because they are not necessary.
Why do/will you want to turn them off?

Do you switch of socket switches?
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
10,358
Reaction score
2,117
Location
Poole, Dorset
Country
United Kingdom
I'm not sure you mean by overloading one end of the ring.
With most of the load right next to the consumer unit, most of the current will be in the short cable between the switches and the CU.
Highly likely to overload that piece of cable, and entirely missing the point of having a ring in the first place.

4mm² as a radial would be a better choice, although having a rack of switches next to the CU under the stairs is still unnecessary and pointless.
 
Joined
15 Jul 2018
Messages
199
Reaction score
8
Country
United Kingdom
Most have knobs or the modern equivalent.

Convenient for what? They are unnecessary because they are not necessary.
Why do/will you want to turn them off?

Do you switch of socket switches?
When travelling I like to switch things off.
 
Joined
15 Jul 2018
Messages
199
Reaction score
8
Country
United Kingdom
With most of the load right next to the consumer unit, most of the current will be in the short cable between the switches and the CU.
Highly likely to overload that piece of cable, and entirely missing the point of having a ring in the first place.

4mm² as a radial would be a better choice, although having a rack of switches next to the CU under the stairs is still unnecessary and pointless.

What happens when i need to turn off the fridge or freezer? Remove the entire integrated appliance forward? That seems inconvenient to me.

The whole house is being rewired and everything is open so cabling is very easy at the moment.
 
Joined
28 Jan 2011
Messages
50,125
Reaction score
3,353
Location
Buckinghamshire
Country
United Kingdom
4mm² as a radial would be a better choice, although having a rack of switches next to the CU under the stairs is still unnecessary and pointless.
I agree with everything else you have said, but it was not just "under the stairs" but, rather, "under the stairs in the kitchen". I took that to mean that the stairs encroached into the kitchen, so that the switches would actually be "in the kitchen" - which, if one is going to have them, is clearly the most appropriate place.

Kind Regards, John
 
Joined
20 Aug 2009
Messages
9,273
Reaction score
1,187
Location
Dorset
Country
United Kingdom
I agree with everything else you have said, but it was not just "under the stairs" but, rather, "under the stairs in the kitchen". I took that to mean that the stairs encroached into the kitchen, so that the switches would actually be "in the kitchen" - which, if one is going to have them, is clearly the most appropriate place.

Kind Regards, John

This is how I read it too.

I don't see why it's deemed pointless to have these switches, it makes a luxury job.

Appliances should be conveniently isolated when required.

Appliances can be accidently switched on without realising, the isolating switches can help to prevent this.

When I have finished using the washing machine or cooker I can safely isolate easily by the switches above the worktop.

Why would you want to leave these things fully connected if they don't have to be?
 
Joined
20 Aug 2009
Messages
9,273
Reaction score
1,187
Location
Dorset
Country
United Kingdom
With most of the load right next to the consumer unit, most of the current will be in the short cable between the switches and the CU.
Highly likely to overload that piece of cable, and entirely missing the point of having a ring in the first place.

4mm² as a radial would be a better choice, although having a rack of switches next to the CU under the stairs is still unnecessary and pointless.

Would the longer length of cable serving the kitchen sockets serving perhaps a kettle, toaster occasional low power small appliances provide enough current once combined with the shorter cable?

Don't most kitchen ring circuits have the potential to be 'unbalanced'?

Has this ever been an actual problem anywhere?

Bearing in mind 4mm cable can be awkward to fit in small terminals, would you rather a ring circuit wired in 2.5mm2 serving JUST the bank of switches?
 
Sponsored Links
Top