Ivy vs Felt flat roof

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I'm building a shed (largish workshop) at the bottom of my garden,
It will have a near flat felt roof, there is ivy growing on the back wall which will grow onto the shed roof.

DSC_1952.jpg


Should I regularly trim back the ivy to stop this happening or will it be OK?

I like the idea of the ivy growing across the roof, it'll look nice, but if it's likely to cause leaks then I'll keep it trim.

What say ye folk of Diynot?
 
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munchingB

dont let it near your roof!

it'll get inside your workshop, lift up the roof and pop up all over the place.

look for a parthenocissus if you want a similar effect but wont tear your roof off : )
 
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Cheers, pretty much as I thought,
it's the neighbours ivy so i'll keep it regularly well trimmed,
easy enough to climb onto the roof anyway.

Would be nice to soften the structure with something, I'll read up on your suggestion.
 
D

Deleted2797112

Virginia creeper wouldn't be my first choice on that structure.

As you're still in the building stage, have you thought about a green roof?
 
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Not enough depth in the rafters to take that kind of weight,
I'm very limited for hight as it needs to be below the level of the wall at the back.

S'pose I could cover it in fake grass(!)
 
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Yes I've the same situation, it's coming over from the neighbours side,

So; free pest instead(!)


As an aside, does anyone know if you can grow clematus out of a big pot/planter?
(or rather the question should be, how well would it grow...)
The soil here is a nice sandy loam.

I don't particularly want long extensive borders and the clean look will better suit my planned garden.
 
D

Deleted2797112

I wouldn't grow clematis montana in a pot. As you can see from the pics, it's a huge vigorous plant. In a pot, the feeding and watering requirements are going to be hard to meet. When it gets to a decent size, you're not going to be able to pot it on, the best you'll be able to do is scrape a bit of the compost off and top dress. Compost only has nutrients for around 6 weeks of growth so you'll have to compensate for that in a pot. Clematis prefers to have its roots kept cool so you'd have to bear that in mind and try to keep the pot shaded. And, there's a risk in a pot of the roots freezing in a bad winter unless you protect them really well. If you really have to go for it, get the very biggest tree pot you can find.
 
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That's a tidy roof, pity to cover such nice bit of woodwork.

But just get the strimmer and flake into that ivy as it will be of little benefit to you up there. Only problem, you will have to go up once or twice a year to keep it off the roof?

Ivy is nice when you can keep it cut back, otherwise it can be costly

I see you have a second wall for your shed. Could you leave the bottom corner with no roof next the ivy, so that you could get a set of steps in to keep it in check?
 
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That's a tidy roof, pity to cover such nice bit of woodwork.

But just get the strimmer and flake into that ivy as it will be of little benefit to you up there. Only problem, you will have to go up once or twice a year to keep it off the roof?

Ivy is nice when you can keep it cut back, otherwise it can be costly

I see you have a second wall for your shed. Could you leave the bottom corner with no roof next the ivy, so that you could get a set of steps in to keep it in check?

Alas, it's all covered up now:
DSC_1976.jpg

Separate thread on it here:
http://www.diynot.com/forums/your-projects/post-beam-garden-motorcycle-workshop.377379/

Suppose it's in the garden so I may try to get it moved here, that way I can keep these questions in there and continue to expand on the later landscaping...

I'll probably just hop up on the roof monthly and give it a trim, it's not high up, hop on the wall and stroll across the roof (it takes my weight fine).
There is a corner out of the roof by the ivy as the roof changes profile, but by the time I've got a couple of tons of wood up the side of the shed (hence the gap and overhang) it'll be tricky to get a ladder down there.
 

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