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Levelling off plasterboard joints

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by Rudie, 8 Jan 2019.

  1. Rudie

    Rudie

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    Hi,

    I am overboarded the loft rafters and am now in the process of plasterboarding. I am screwing in the plasterboard into the rafter beams through the insulation. My problem is that on some joins, the is a ridge of up to 5mm - seems a bit too much to level off via skimming. Its mainly down to the joins not falling near a rafter. One side like you can push level to the other plasterboard, but when released, it raises back out. Is there an easy solution?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Bonni

    Bonni

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    Two ways.

    You must have a good background, so before insulating and plasterboarding, you could screw lengths of timber to the rafters and string line them through to get a flat even background.

    In your case, scrim tape the joints and skim bonding over before plastering out. Plaster is only as flat as the background and can often feel smooth but not flat.

    DIY'ers often soldier on. Two things in the trade, you need a datum to work off and it's all about getting the background right before carrying on. In your case, you would sort the two end rafters first with the timber to the angle/height/plane you want them, then string line though to set the others. That datum sets up all the the new timbers and it will give you a flat even background to work off.
     
  3. Rudie

    Rudie

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    Thanks for the reply. I was hoping not to have to take off the insulation! I was hoping there would be some clips that would fit under the flush plasterboard and then over the 'sticking out' plasterboard in order to get them lined up. Will take a look later on.
     
  4. NeedHelpDIY

    NeedHelpDIY

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    Stating the obvious, but are you using tapered edge boards? I would have also suggested using a 15mm board; double boarding with 12.5mm or getting it skimmed post drylining.

    Double boarding is the simplest way of accomplishing a even surface for a diyer if you already have the boards. The joints should be staggered as well.

    Hope this helps
     
  5. Rudie

    Rudie

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    Hi using straight edged boards 12.5mm. yes i am staggering the joins too.
     
  6. NeedHelpDIY

    NeedHelpDIY

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    That will more than likely why the joins are more pronounced. The tapered edge is for what they call tape and joint - paper or mesh tape (scrim) and stuck into the residual tapered joint with filler and then a layer of filler is feathered over the top to create a flush finish.

    This is a great resource https://www.familyhandyman.com/drywall/taping/how-to-tape-drywall-joints/view-all/

    Also attached is an image iOS Image - 2976284313.jpg
     
  7. Rudie

    Rudie

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    Here is a slight raise (sorry pic didnt upload! will try tomorrow)
     
    Last edited: 9 Jan 2019
  8. roy c

    roy c

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    I would follow Bonni's advice...
     
  9. Rudie

    Rudie

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    48314707-2D7B-43FA-B5D2-1BB432E52337.jpeg Pic
     
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