Light weight nail gun?

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My current "nail gun" is a Stanley electric thing https://smile.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000BPSUTM

It's actually quite good but it's really just an electric stapler, it only takes brads up to 14mm I think which is great for craft or very light trim but for even light DIY purposes not so much. Eg fitting skirting beads the nails are just a few mm too short.

I don't want a pro nailgun since it's vastly beyond what I need, and they're pricey. I am wondering do they come in different grades... If so is there something one step up that can do useful work with small nails?

I am not going to get a compressed air rig so mains or ideally battery are the options? My other battery kit is DeWalt.
 
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Any general overview of nailgun types and nails in general would be really useful... A totally new area to me!
 
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if your after a structural then look up "collated nail" where the heads grip
anything with a shank less than 3mm won't have much strength
 
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By lightweight I assume you are referring to what we call "2nd fix' (or non-structural guns). In the main these come in four brad/pun/nail thicknesses (listed from smallest diameter to largest):

22 to 23 gauge - c.12 to 40mm in the main, used to fix small section mouldings to other timbers, e.g. small bearings. Straight collated available with or without heads. Mainly used in areas such as furniture making. Holes almost invisible. You'll sometimes see 21 gauge as well

18 ga: c.16 to 50mm in the main. Straight collated. Used for attaching bearings to furniture etc can also be used for small section 2nd fix joinery, e.g skirtings, architraves, etc.

16 ga: 16 to 64mm long. Straight or angle collated (angled from 32 to 64mm). Mainly used for 2nd fix joinery.

15 ga: 32 to 64mm long. Angle collated only, two types: DA and FN. Far larger head than 16 ga and stronger shanks so better pull out resistance. Used for same purposes as 16ga but also used for lightweight framing etc

Above that you are into first fix nailers

TBH I think you should be looking for a 16 ga or possibly an 18 ga gun capable of firing 50mm nails. Best bang per buck comes from a small compressor and pneumatic gun combo, just avoid guns which say they fire both staples and nails - they do, but leave girt great marks in the wood with pins
 
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Thanks. I was reading a bit today and hadn't come across 1st/2nd fix terminology before. And gauges is not a measurement I'm familiar with so I have to keep looking that up :) It seems like the nails themselves are somewhat standardised?
 
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The gauge is as in standard wire gauge (look that up). 1st and 2nd fix is carpentry terminology and apt as the main users of nail guns are carpenters. Nails are pretty standard, so nails from Senco will fit Paslide whose nails will fit Hikoki whose nails will fit Makita, etc, etc. Angled adds a little complication with 15 ga guns as there are two defined standards, the Bostitch standard (FN) and the Senco standard (DA). They have different angles of slope
 
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