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Looking for some general advice on painting walls/ceiling

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by DrEvil, 4 Apr 2011.

  1. DrEvil

    DrEvil

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    I have a new place to live which means a whole lot more painting, and whilst I’ve done plenty of decorating in the past would just like to improve my finish etc, Found alot of info on this forum already but still have some more queries, so would really appreciate input. I'm going to post about the prep side first, but probably follow on with my paint/roller queries later...

    Base surface background:

    The place is a Victorian house and the majority of surfaces I’ll be looking to paint are previously matt painted lining paper (I assume a vinyl matt). I’m planning on patching up the various old hanging screw/nail holes and then painting over this surface. The wall are fairly flat at the moment, and good enough for me so I’m going to leave the lining paper in place (and I know that if I pull down the lining paper a fair amount of plaster will probably come with it).

    There are some hairline cracks in the walls, coving, and some cracking between wood (frames and skirting) and walls.

    Filling in wood to wall cracks:

    So for the wood to wall cracks I planning on just using some decorators caulk (I’ll get some branded stuff this time). I’ve previously had ok but not perfect results here in getting it truely flat after – usually just using a damp sponge to wipe down soon after application – are there any better ways?

    Filling holes in walls:

    Seen several recommendations for Easifill here – best to do several stage fill or these holes? Any other advice?

    Hairline cracks in walls and coving:

    Whats the best way of getting these covered? Most postings I’ve seen seem to say if you use filler it is just likely to reappear? Whilst I can use caulk, I always think that emulsion over caulk (when not in a corner) can be quite visible. Are there flexible fillers – or can you add something to make it a bit more flexible (a bit like getting flexible adhesive/grout for tiles)?

    Any other thoughts on best way to tackle these?

    General wall prep:

    I was planning on giving it a sugar soap/rinse, but then should I give the old walls a gentle sand (standard 120 grit paper, or 240?), then wipe? Reason I’m wondering this is if it is vinyl, then a sand may help it key?

    Also I want to change the colour, is it best to put a thinned matt white diluted layer on the wall first? Or more than one coat of this? Or should I use the intended colour to be painted?

    Should I sand in between coats (and again – above grit suitable?).

    Thanks for any advice in advance!
     
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  3. misterhelpful

    misterhelpful

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    Seeing as you don't want to know much, I'll do my best. :eek:

    Caulk for door frames etc is ideal and you are right in what you say about not using it on wall cracks. Use of a damp sponge or wet finger is best but some caulks recommend dry smoothing - check tube!

    This is a good flexible filler for the walls and coving: http://www.trade1st.co.uk/productdetail/Flexible-Filler/103.aspx and this is the fine surface version for the hairline cracks: http://www.trade1st.co.uk/productdetail/Fine-Surface-Filler/107.aspx but there are many good ones about.

    It's best to fill wall cracks in two applications when you have lining paper, removing as much excess as possible each time because heavy sanding will damage the paper.

    Be careful when sugar soaping/rinsing, as too much moisture can loosen the paper.

    Use 180 grit sandpaper on the filler and lightly over the walls before the first coat and 240 between subsequent coats, wiping dust each time. Anything coarser is liable to damage the paper. If the existing paint is vinyl silk sanding will give a better key, especially if changing to matt. It is not essential between coats but will remove nibs to give you a smoother finish.

    If going for a big colour change, ie dark to light, it's a good idea to use white as a base - cheaper too.

    I need a rest now!! ;)
     
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  4. DrEvil

    DrEvil

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    Yep, sorry that was a big ask in one go, but I thought easier than lots of little questions!

    Thanks for your answers, all much clearer in my head now!
     
  5. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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