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Mulling over.....

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by conny, 25 Apr 2021.

  1. conny

    conny

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    Knocking down my main shed and building/buying a new one to approximately the same size, (12' x 11').
    The problem is, the original one is actually sunk below ground level of the drive and because of this the floor is getting a bit soft and squishy. It's quite a large drive so may consider building it over on the left at ground level but this will still entail knocking down the old one and filling in the hole it would leave. This is my main problem. The hole would be 12' x 11' x 12" deep What would I need, (hardcore, MOT 1, sand etc and roughly how much of each), to fill this hole and male it strong enough to carry the weight of a car. A further complication is the ground at the back of the shed falls away to the field at a lower level next door.
    Only mulling it over at the moment as it is rented property and I will need to speak with the owner before doing it but I'm sure he would agree.

    IMG_0302.JPG

    The step down to get in.

    IMG_0303.JPG

    Behind the back.

    IMG_0304.JPG
     
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  3. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    That's about 5.5 cubic yards or 4 cubic metres.
    12" x 12" x12" for ease.

    Don't suppose you could use something like farm jacks to lift the whole (empty) thing up and spread MOT1 or similar under it before putting it back?
     
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  4. conny

    conny

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    Thought about that because the owner is a farmer, and would have stuff like that, but just been inside and the floor is shot to bits. There is obviously no DPM under it or around the sides below ground level so it would probably collapse anyway.

    So would I be able to compact a load of hardcore to within 3" of the top then finish with a 3" slab of concrete? I am thinking I could then use battens and boards to achieve a level base, bearer joists on top of the boards with a dpm across the whole lot and then site a new shed on top?
     
  5. IT Minion

    IT Minion

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    Why not just sit the new shed on concrete blocks/pads in the corners. It'll lift the shed off the floor and allow airflow to keep the joists dry without the extra fun of tons of MOT and Concrete.
     
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  6. conny

    conny

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    Good point. If I put a suspended 'floor' over the hole it would certainly solve the damp problem. What do you think about keeping wildlife out by the use of wire netting around the pit edges? By wildlife I'm thinking possibly field mice, rats, (which we have never seen any signs of fortunately), maybe small birds etc
     
  7. IT Minion

    IT Minion

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    Makes sense to me, although you'll probably want to bury it fairly deep to avoid them tunneling in.
     
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  8. conny

    conny

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    Might lay it as a 'carpet across the bottom of the pit and up the walls then lay another layer at right angles and up the walls of the pit. Toss a few bags of gravel over the base to hold it all down and stake the sides into place with some battens.
     
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