Oak post and beam joint.

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I'm replacing an internal, load bearing wall with a green oak post and beam, all specified and checked by SE. Building inspector is happy.
Post 150x150mm, beam 100x200mm. (100 wide by 200 high just to clarify) One end of beam into wall, other end onto the post, so joined at the corner.
I was originally going to get an oak framing company to make up the parts for me including a corner bracket/brace.
SE says that unless we want it for looks the brace will add nothing so we are going for just the post and beam. Which got me to thinking if it's just the one joint surely I could do that myself?

Due to space restrictions the beam will have to go in first (directly under rafters) and then the post. There is also not room to drop the post down to shove it up into the beam, it basically will have to move sideways into position.
My question is if I do a mortice and tenon joint, beam into post what would be the minimum size shoulders I should have on the tenon so the join remains neat after shrinkage? Is that even the best joint to use? the mortice would have to be right at the end of the beam so 2 open sides, is that a problem?

Am I able to do this without buying any special tools? Bit OTT for one joint.
 
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I think you need to look at a draw-pinned open mortise joint. These look a bit like a bridle joint with one end lopped off. The joint can be assembled by sliding the post in from the side. The tenon is then locked in place by using a couple of hardwood "dowels" or pegs (maybe the origin of the square peg in a round hole saying?). This technique was commonly used on oak framing in the past.

You may well need a draw bore pin or a modern podge (basically a tapered steel alignment pin) to pull the joint in together. Sawing the joint may require a hand rip saw or frame saw (i.e. a Continental pattern wood frame saw such as those still made by ECE and Ulmia and not one of those steel framed monstrosities) with a blade designed to cut green timber, as ordinary hardpoint saws don't always do so well in it, especially on deep rip cuts
 
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it basically will have to move sideways into position.

if I do a mortice and tenon joint,

A motise or a tenon won't be moving sideways when no upwards lift of the beam is possible.

the beam will have to go in first

Then it will sit on top of the post just fine.
I have used forstner bits to make angled recesses in posts to screw them down with coach screws.
Also easy enough to make dowels to fill the hole.

Its like a giant version of this...

14928d1273941572-table-tops-pocket-holes-pocket-hole-joinery.jpg
 

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