OK to use bulb adaptor?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by JohnBoyII, 24 Oct 2014.

  1. JohnBoyII

    JohnBoyII

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    I've got a kitchen light fitting that takes 4 GU10 bulbs. To save energy I've been using 11W CFL bulbs, but they cost a lot and don't seem to last very long, nothing like the 8000 hours they claim. I've like to fit a GU10 to E27 adaptor and then use a "normal" 11W low energy bulb, they're a lot cheaper and last a lot longer because I use them elsewhere.

    It is OK to use these adaptors?
    Do I have to replace all 4 bulbs at the same time of can I swap in an adaptor as each CFL bulb goes?
     
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  3. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Funny, that, isn't it.

    Actually, FYI, when a lamp manufacturer clams a life of X hours, what they mean is that by X hours only 50% of lamps will have failed.


    Would it not be easier and a lot more elegant to just replace the light?
     
  4. DaftPunk

    DaftPunk

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    Fit LED GU10s. They last for ages and ages, give a nicer light than CFLs, are at full brightness as soon as you switch them on, and you won't have to adapt or replace your existing fittings.
     
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  5. ericmark

    ericmark

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    I found the same with CFL I bought 16 all Philips which I considered as a good make they should have been reduced to 8 lamps running after 10 years had they done as claimed by the packet.

    However they failed rather fast and since 10 in one room and 6 in the other my wife bought 6 cheap bulbs and we used the remaining Philips to replace those in the room with 10.

    Within 2 years no spares left although non of the cheap bulbs had failed. So as a temporary replaced two of the globe 8W CFL with two candle 1.6W LED bulbs and was impressed. Next time Lidi had them in stock they were 3W so got another 8 and not one has blown and room is far brighter.

    This has taught me a few things. One don't buy expensive bulbs. Two LED light works well.

    I know you can get GU10 to SES adaptors and using LED bulbs likely it would work i.e. fit the holder. Both at 230 volt so could do one at a time. However the LED GU10 bulbs do start quite cheap my local Woolworths all seem to have been taken over by G&M bargains a Blackpool and Cleveleys firm and offer packs of three 2W GU10 bulbs for £7 and I have been surprised on how well they work.

    As you go up in power so the price sores but I also used 11W cold cathode and would say 2W LED is brighter than 11W cold cathode.
     
  6. JohnBoyII

    JohnBoyII

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    I'd love to replace them with a different light but my better half said they're staying, so that's that!

    I tried LEDs about two years ago but the problem I had was that the beam width was very narrow, about 40 deg. I think. As the kitchen is oblong, ended up with dark patches. Only went for CFLs at the time because they have a 100 deg. beam angle.

    Happy to give LEDs another try, but can you get them with a wide beam? I tried screwfix, Toolstation and a few others but they's are all still around 40 deg. width.
     
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  8. ericmark

    ericmark

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    The cheap lamps I talked about are rated as a 30° beam. In general if you don't want a beam then you don't use GU10 lamps.

    I can see your point with the woman who will not allow lamps to be changed and so the problem is with the GU10 to SES converter how much of the bulb will be masked by the fitting?

    Looking at my box of bulbs my 3W LED is narrower that the MR16 glass so it would seem they will physical fit. Many of the LED bulbs seem to have a heat sink next to the screw fitting like this one.
    [​IMG]
    So the part of the bulb inside the fitting does not emit any light so I think likely it would work well.
    The [​IMG] adaptor pushes the bulb out of the hole anyway.

    I am sure you will get some objections from your wife as those lamps will not look good to some peoples eyes but will produce a talking point women seem to love both complaining about and praising there husbands so it will be one or the other.

    I would love to hear out it works. I am sure it will work but what it will look like and what the light will be like is something else. But many have GU10's and wish they did not so you may have the answer to many peoples problem.
     
  9. 333rocky333

    333rocky333

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    Does such an adapter exist, i would be wary of a cheap adapter, as there could be a chance of leaving an exposed live lamp thread
     
  10. ericmark

    ericmark

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    I would agree but it would seem there are a lot of problems with LED lights anyway with many having no glass between the LED and bulb outer and exposed live parts on the bulb.

    Years ago we would not dream of changing a bulb that is switched on but with LED the bulb is cold.

    [​IMG] This is an example of lights with live parts which can be touched. With GU10 even worse as no polarity.

    It would seem some of the cheap devices do not have little transformers but use resistors and capacitors to reduce voltage and these are inserted on one leg only.

    Loads of videos showing tests on these bulbs it seems this [​IMG] is used so with any lamp always switch off first.

    Sorry bulb image does not work.
     
  11. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    [​IMG]
     
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