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Options for tidying/resurfacing concrete drive

Discussion in 'Building' started by GettingOnWithItAll, 11 Oct 2018.

  1. GettingOnWithItAll

    GettingOnWithItAll

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    Apologies in advance if this is answered elsewhere, I can't find it and a general internet search only throws up what I consider biased articles.

    What realistic options do I have for tidying up an old concrete drive and path that is curved and on a slope?

    I was thinking of resin bound aggregate DIY, particularly as I can extend that to the ugly concrete side to the house (8m x 2.5m), but am having second thoughts. I'm suspicious of concrete skims and tarmac, and ripping it out for block paving seems excessive

    In more detail:
    • It's serviceable but ugly, and as I'm redoing the back of the house now seems a good time to tidy it.
    • It is 3.5m x 8m with a tangential path 0.8 x 5m in the same concrete mix.
    • The original concrete seems to be 20mm aggregate to the surface and has an area 1m x 6m of smooth new concrete where the drains were replaced. There is a standard manhole cover and an old 1.5m crack from this to the side of the drive.
    • The drive is curved, moving from roughly level at the pavement to 15% for most of its length.
    • I do my own car maintainance on the drive so resistance to oil etc would be a bonus.
    • I like to think of myself as a reasonably competent DIYer and have the time to do a proper job.
    • I'm not restricted by budget, so I'm primarily looking for a good balance between quality, performance and cost. I don't mind paying extra to get a professional in, but that would hurt my pride and I like the flexibility of DIY.
    • We're likely to be moving in around 2 years' time so what appeals to buyers is as important as to what appeals to us.
    Thanks in advance for any advice.
     
  2. blup

    blup

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    Have the same decision to make.

    Resin bonded gravel costs the same according to the contractors who have quoted for us, not sure why as there is a lot less work. But it is like a tight t shirt in that it will show off what's underneath, so any imperfections or differences in level of your existing concrete will be shown up.

    Concrete and tarmac are the most functional but out of fashion.

    If you're moving in two years, maybe it's got to be block paving, if only because that is what everyone likes. Weeds will eventually grow through, it will discolour and is difficult to clean (pressure washing dislodges the sand beneath it), and you may get settlement. But it should still look OK after two years.

    Just some observations.

    Blup
     
  3. jonbey

    jonbey

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    My drive is concrete, with half with tarmac on top. The other half was gravel, but was removed for skips and building material.
    Would not have block paving - weeds will grow.
    Heard that resin can churn up if you need to turn your wheels when stationary, especially if you have a large car / van etc.
    I might get the rest tarmaced when I have the money. Lasts ages.
     
  4. John D v2.0

    John D v2.0

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    I would add to the previous help giveng iven block paving weeds don't actually grow through. It's a common misconception but it's basically impossible.

    What actually happens is seeds get trapped in the cracks with the dirt and germinate in the normal way and then root down from the top.

    In practical terms it's the same either way, you have to weed constantly:LOL: but the main thing is don't let a contractor charge extra for special weed proof membranes to go underneath as they are useless for preventing weeds.
     
  5. garyo

    garyo

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    I didn't realise that - I'd presumed you'd just throw more in if you had a dip, and then it's all floated flat and hidden?
     
  6. cdbe

    cdbe

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    When they did my neighbours (I presume a cheapish job so they could sell the house) they filled the big holes with tarmac. The resin (bound) filled the rest, it was about an inch thick, hand spread and follows every dip and undulation in the 20m long driveway - but superficially it looks ok after 3 years.
    My own block paving is approaching it's second birthday - in just under 100m2 it's had 3 weeds in it - and they were where I had to do an emergency pressure wash and washed out some sand (accidentally pulled driveshaft out of car while changing shock absorber and lost the gearbox oil!). As John says they grow in from the top where there's a void, it's just a maintenance issue - an annual topup of sand is all that's needed.
     
  7. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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