Painting Garage

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I am going to paint the inside of my garage which is lined with regular breeze blocks. I am thinking of putting on a layer of diluted pva followed by regular emulsion. My worry is that the garage is adjoined by a boiler room with a gas boiler. There is also a small freezer in the garage. Both of these generate heat and the garage is always warm inside. If I use the pva layer could that generate condensation. Would a couple of layers if masonry paint be a better idea? Thanks in anticipation
 
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I wouldn't worry too much about PVA but you could add PVA and water to some emulsion as bare brick/block will suck up a lot of a first coat. Once dry use one or two coats of straight emulsion.

I did mine ages ago and it makes a huge difference to the feel plus you can actuallly see!
I did the ceiling and walls, once done I did the floor with floor paint. That way I didn't worry about drips on the floor. I painted the first (three?) rows of bricks with floor paint then applied the main floor with a cheap soft broom. Just threw the broom away.
 
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I would pva all the blocks and then give it 2 -3 coats of masonry paint, personally better in a garage than emulsion
 

JohnD

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I am going to paint the inside of my garage which is lined with regular breeze blocks. I am thinking of putting on a layer of diluted pva followed by regular emulsion. My worry is that the garage is adjoined by a boiler room with a gas boiler. There is also a small freezer in the garage. Both of these generate heat and the garage is always warm inside. If I use the pva layer could that generate condensation. Would a couple of layers if masonry paint be a better idea? Thanks in anticipation

Why do you want a water soluble glue on your painted walls? If the walls get damp the paint will peel off.

Instead, follow the manufacturers instructions and apply one or two mist coats of paint thinned with water.

I find a large coarse brush is better on rough surfaces than a roller as you can scrub and stipple it into the surface.

Mist coats soak in and dry quickly. By the time your first coat is finished you can go back to the first corner and it will probably be ready for the second. You will know when you have applied enough to kill the suction because the wall will no longer suck your brush dry. You can then apply unthinned paint.

I agree masonry paint is more durable in a garage because you can wash it with water and even scrub it. But not if the paint is lying on a film of water-soluble glue, as it will bubble or peel.
 
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