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Pipe bending

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by RPerrin, 22 Jan 2016.

  1. RPerrin

    RPerrin

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    Hiya, novice here, be gentle.

    I am installing a radiator in my hall, and the pipes drop from the ceiling, and then run horizontally to the rad. The rad has angled valves.

    With the horizontal run fitted along the wall, the valve positions are slightly forward of the run, so I want to bend the end of the pipe away from the wall and add an elbow, so it meets the fitting.

    I was thinking of fitting a slightly longer pipe to the wall, bending it in situ, to about 45 degrees with a spring, and then cutting it back to align it with the valve. I could then add an elbow, with a short length of pipe, or a street fitting to join up to the valve.

    Is there a better way? I don't plan doing (much) more plumbing, so didn't want to invest in a proper pipe bender.

    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: 22 Jan 2016
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  3. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Only personally speaking but I don't think these bending springs are very good for a beginner......have you considered 45 degree end fed bends, which will achieve similar results?
    John :)
     
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  4. RPerrin

    RPerrin

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    Hi John

    Thanks for the reply. I've only ever used Yorkshire's, but they seem a little bulky. I guess I could give end feed a try, as they seem to take less space. What solder would you recommend for central heating? I've heard some are easier to use/flow (for a novice) than others. I have a basic torch, but nothing special.
     
  5. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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  6. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    The end fed fittings are a little thinner than the solder ring, for sure but the principle is much the same.
    Get the pipe and fittings spotlessly clean, either with wire wool or abrasive pads or whatever, add some flux and as its for heating rather than potable water a cored resin flux / solder will work well.
    Get a bit of practice first if you can, don't overfill the joint with solder and as the pipes are (presumably) 15mm a basic torch should be ok. The joint must be completely dry though, and do flush it out afterwards!
    I'll probably get shot down here, but Bakers Fluid or Fluxite are traditional recipies for flux, and leaded electronics solder (60% lead 40% tin) works superbly. Solder for potable water should be lead free these days, so how those people with lead pipes are surviving is anyone's guess!
    Be lucky
    John :)
     
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  7. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    (Not sure what's happened there.....that should have posted ages ago!):eek:
    John :)
     
  8. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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    If you don't intend doing much Plumbing mate, then a 15mm Spring is the way to go. For a couple of quid you'll enjoy messing around with it & there's videos on Utube giving you the lowdown.
    HTH
     
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  9. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Certainly no harm in giving it a bash.....maybe using some new pipe which you can bend, and then cut to length and fit afterwards. I've just found old pipe pretty unforgiving in the past :eek:
    John :)
     
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  11. gasmanstu72

    gasmanstu72

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    turn the valves sideways, so the bottom of the valve is on the radiator, that way you can rotate it so you can just get a 90 elbow from pipe to valve
    some people prefer to fit valves this way anyway.

    like this,
    [​IMG]
     
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  12. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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    It's the optimum orientation fella. It says it in the installation instructions ken eh??!!! Who the f.ck is Kenny??
     
    Last edited: 23 Jan 2016
  13. RPerrin

    RPerrin

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    Thanks for the advice all. I got a spring this morning from screwfix, and cracked on with it, so missed the last few posts. I've put some picks in an album. Not perfect perhaps, but looks ok, and it works :). The vertical pipes look out of plumb, but it is, in fact, the wall of our 1940's house :).

     
    Last edited: 23 Jan 2016
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  14. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    A smart professional job mate! Have you any plans for disguising the pipes up the wall?
    I hope you qualify for many brownie points......
    John :)
     
  15. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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    Well done mate.
     
  16. Echo the husky

    Echo the husky

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    (y) That looks great, no need to hide them! It's also nice to see the pipes properly supported so they won't sag in a few years time, you don't get that around here.
     
  17. gasmanstu72

    gasmanstu72

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    decent job is that!

    lick of paint on the pipes to match the wall and it's job done!
     
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