Plaster absorbing Screed moisture

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Getting an outbuilding built at the moment, permitted development but constructing it to building regs. My builder did drywall and plaster followed by screed, but now I'm worried there's a hidden defect as the plaster has seemingly absorbed moisture from the screed.

Should I be worried?

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Thank you, and to think I'm paying a so called professional! :mad:
 
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It will all dry out in the next few weeks and as long as the screed hasn't a dpm problem what is the actual issue?
 
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It will all dry out in the next few weeks and as long as the screed hasn't a dpm problem what is the actual issue?

It's been 2 weeks already! (Although weather hasn't been favourable) Hence the worry something more was wrong.
 

JohnD

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I prefer a skirting-board sized gap, with a batten top and bottom to fix the skirting.

there's no need to have plaster behind skirting boards.
 
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Except to avoid the event that has happened why would you need a gap i.e. say the screed had been laid months ago and was completely dry what would be the need for a gap (except saving the plasterers bad back and the hassle of finishing a corner off)?
 
D

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There was no need to have plaster behind skirtings 150 years ago when ventilation was essential and rising and penetrating damp was the main consideration. fillers and modern techniques were unthought of.
removing say 150mm from the bottom of a perfectly good new plastered wall to say replace it with battens and say a 150mm skirting sounds nonsensical to me and flies in the face of modern best practise .
take an inch off the bottom to prevent the chance of any damp or moisture rising from the floor and bond or pin your nice fresh new modern skirting to your nice new flat plastered walls.
 
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There was no need to have plaster behind skirtings 150 years ago when ventilation was essential and rising and penetrating damp was the main consideration. fillers and modern techniques were unthought of.
removing say 150mm from the bottom of a perfectly good new plastered wall to say replace it with battens and say a 150mm skirting sounds nonsensical to me and flies in the face of modern best practise .
take an inch off the bottom to prevent the chance of any damp or moisture rising from the floor and bond or pin your nice fresh new modern skirting to your nice new flat plastered walls.

I shouldn't be getting damp patches though should I? Or is that due to the moisture being released?

I'm getting rather worried!

IMG20211024191532.jpg IMG20211024191607.jpg
 

JohnD

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i have seen similar happen when their was a leaking pipe in the floor.

are the walls lightweight foamed blocks? And in contact with the floor slab?
 
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i have seen similar happen when their was a leaking pipe in the floor.

are the walls lightweight foamed blocks? And in contact with the floor slab?

There is a DPC but I think they are thermalite or similar lightweight blocks, the way the screed was laid there is contact possibly behind skim coat and plaster.

I've been assured there's no issue and it will all dry out in time, but I am not convinced.
 

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if there is no issue, it will dry out.

if there is a leaking pipe, it won't.

draw a pencil line along the edge of the wet patch, see if it shrinks, grows, or stays the same.

Ventilate it very well to dry it out. it will dry with fresh air, not with heat.
 

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