Plastering Courses

Joined
15 Jan 2014
Messages
69
Reaction score
1
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
Hi,

I am thinking of taking an intensive plastering course. I'm never going to be able to afford all of the plastering work that needs to be done in my house. I also thought that it may be useful skill to supplement my income.

Anyway, I've found a place in Essex called the golden trowel. Here is their website, http://www.goldtrowel.co.uk/

Has anyone heard of these guys? Do you know if they are any good?

Thanks in advance
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
7 May 2009
Messages
34
Reaction score
5
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
Hi,

I did a course at a place in Crawley, I just wanted to build some basic skill level so I could attempt some renovation work on my property. For that purpose it was ideal, ended up with some reasonable work that I was happy with and saved money. Fast track courses are no substitute for a full time apprenticeship and although you'll no doubt think at the end of your week or two that you can then go and be a self-employed, you'll have neither the experience or competence to match a qualified person no matter how good the course.

Great though if you just want to do your own work on your own property and be proud of the results. Good luck
 
Joined
25 Oct 2008
Messages
1,180
Reaction score
144
Location
Cheshire
Country
United Kingdom
Did a course also to get me started, as had diy house renovation to do.
Completely agree with ginger biscuit.
They liked to big-up the course to suggest you could do it professionally immediately after, but do not think it is realistic.
Should be fine to get you started at diy though.

Only other advice to offer is start with small walls first and build up.
Ceilings are tough, beware!
 
Joined
15 Jan 2014
Messages
69
Reaction score
1
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
Hi, thanks for the replies.

II appreciate that I will not be able to obtain a professional standard immediately. I was just wondering if anyone has had experience with this particular school, i.e. the golden trowel?

I was thinking of doing the 5 day course. The 5 day course is identical the first week of the 5 week NVQ level 2 plastering course. It seems that the rest of the NVQ level 2 course is practising the skills learnt in the first week, along with the assessment, so I should get a lot of information out of the 5 day course.
 
Joined
25 Oct 2008
Messages
1,180
Reaction score
144
Location
Cheshire
Country
United Kingdom
I was just wondering if anyone has had experience with this particular school, i.e. the golden trowel?

Not exp on this one, I used a local one in Manchester - but from looking at their website, they emphasise the hands-on practice, which is key.

In their values on their website they quote 'You should visit us and see for yourself, have a free taster day and learn the RIGHT way.'
Maybe take them up on the taster and see?
 

ree

Joined
6 Feb 2014
Messages
3,193
Reaction score
449
Location
California
Country
United Kingdom
NVQ 2 in five weeks is a nonsense, unless its some kind of re-up for experienced plasterers. No novice could possibly be up to NVQ 2 speed in practice and knowledge in 5 weeks.

Who would supervise the examinations?

As for a one week course, attendee's on here claim competence to practice on their own homes, and thats fair enough.

But as for plastering for pay ... would you like someone to fix your brakes after a 5 day "course"? Would you consider it honest?
 
Joined
15 Jan 2014
Messages
69
Reaction score
1
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
Thanks for the responses.

I think I might pop down and have a look at the place. Thanks for the advice DIYnewbee99, I hadn't noticed that on their website.

But as for plastering for pay ... would you like someone to fix your brakes after a 5 day "course"?

I suppose that would depend on how long it took to learn how to fix brakes.

Would you consider it honest?

Surely that would depend on whether or not you clearly stated the length of your training to the client, and not on the length of the training itself. For instance, people often get their hair cut cheaply by trainee hairdressers. It's not dishonest as both parties are aware of the situation.

Anyway, it seems that the consensus is that plastering takes time and effort to master, which is cool. I wasn't thinking of doing it for payment after a five day course. It was more along the lines of learning a life skill that, at some point in the future and after much practice, I may be able to make some money from.
 

ree

Joined
6 Feb 2014
Messages
3,193
Reaction score
449
Location
California
Country
United Kingdom
Dont be preposterous:

Your answer is evasive. Its an obviously yes or no answer.

Comparisons can only be made using like with like. Are you aware of any building trade advert that offers a service where you pay for someone to practice on your house?
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
15 Jan 2014
Messages
69
Reaction score
1
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
To be honest, I don't really know why you've taken such offence. I've clearly already taken on board what people have said in previous posts.

In terms of my answer, I was simply making an analogy, which is exactly what you did in your previous post.

Comparisons can only be made using like with like.

So there are brakes in houses?! Sorry, I thought you were talking about cars.

Ree, sorry if I've caused offence and I hope you enjoy the rest of your evening/day.
 
Joined
6 Oct 2007
Messages
2,883
Reaction score
504
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
Saem here -

only way to learn is to have a go.

Better if you can get guidance, of course, but I think the OP has realistic expectations of what can be achieved in that time frame.

Remember it's not 'Practice makes Pefect' but 'Practice makes Permanent'



'Perfect Practice makes Perfect'!
 

ree

Joined
6 Feb 2014
Messages
3,193
Reaction score
449
Location
California
Country
United Kingdom
The OP claimed that "it might be a useful skill to supplement my income" and that was my main objection.

That we all must start at the start is an obvious truth, but a curious thing to say.
I've already indicated that what he does as a DIY'er is none of my business, and good luck to him. As i've made plain on a number of occasions on here, i'm all for DIY'ing and having a go - safety being the only iffy issue.

But do you three professional spreads consider it fine and dandy that someone should ply their trade as a professional plasterer on the basis of a short course and a bit of home DIY?

Its not about the OP's "realistic expectations" but the fact that he presumed at some future date to plaster for money.
 
Joined
2 Aug 2007
Messages
4,757
Reaction score
718
Location
Moray
Country
United Kingdom
Ree, first of all, let me say how much i enjoy reading your knowlegeable comments and advice on here. It's always good to see a variety of opinion, plus i think we have a good squad on here, yourself very much included, and between us all, we can answer most of the queries and questions regarding the plastering/rendering trade.

It is the ambition of many people to learn a trade of some kind, hopefuly giving them continuity of work throughout their working life. The ultimate way to learn a trade of course, is through an apprenticeship, although plastering apprenticeships would be harder to get nowadays.

The next best way to learn, if you're lucky, is through maybe working alongside a tradesman as "an improver",, picking up the skills of the trade day by day, with " hands on experience", a great opportunity to be had, but as i said, i you're lucky.

The third way to learn the basics of a trade nowadays is to go on a course, where you are taught "the basics", then when you finish the course, it's up to you, the individual, what way you want to go, whether they use their newly learned skill to spruce up a room or two, do a small job or two for a friend or relation to earn a few quid, or just forget about plastering etc altogether.

Serving an apprenticeship doesn't make anyone a plasterer/tradesman. It helps, but if you don't have the passion or the 100% commitment in the trade/job, the finished product wont be the best,, but then you can get someone who goes on a plastering course, realises that this is the best thing he's ever done, then by keeping on doing it over the months and years, becomes a competent tradesman, passionate about his job, turning out quality work all the time. That's my take on it anyway guys. ;)
 
Joined
19 Dec 2009
Messages
2,730
Reaction score
418
Location
Hampshire
Country
United Kingdom
The OP claimed that "it might be a useful skill to supplement my income" and that was my main objection.
ree i know of at least 3 none professional plasterers who supplement their income in exactly the same way as the op envisages
and their work is good in fact better than a lot of spreads that i have seen out onsite, "and" it is a usefull skill indeed to supplement your income im not sure why you would object to this
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Top