Protecting Oak Worktop from Gas Hob and Heat marks

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In the new kitchen we have an oak worktop and a flush fitted duel fuel Hob.

its been coated with osmo oil, but after a few months use we are noticing the wood is darkening (not massively but it is noticeable) close to the gas burner.

Its a pretty powerful gas burner - 6kw according to the spec. On its lowest setting its probably as powerful as the big burner on our old Hob!

I will sand and re-oil the worktop, but what can I put on it to protect it from the heat on that side when it is used? perhaps a strip of stainless steel?
 
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In the new kitchen we have an oak worktop and a flush fitted duel fuel Hob.

its been coated with osmo oil, but after a few months use we are noticing the wood is darkening (not massively but it is noticeable) close to the gas burner.

Its a pretty powerful gas burner - 6kw according to the spec. On its lowest setting its probably as powerful as the big burner on our old Hob!

I will sand and re-oil the worktop, but what can I put on it to protect it from the heat on that side when it is used? perhaps a strip of stainless steel?
Do you mean free standing cooker?
 
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I don't think you can do all that much to protect the top, partly because wood always discolours and scorches when over heated and any coating you could apply would be far too thin to act as an insulator.

TBH I can't recall ever seeing an inset hob being used with a wooden top - you normally see wooden worktops used with either slot-in cookers, or more often with Agas, Rayburns or the like, possibly because that gives you an "air break" between the cooker top and the worktop. If there isn't already a fire mastic bead between the hob and the worktop that would help reduce the amount of heat being conducted into the worktop. You could also try to improve the air flow of the extraction in order to reduce the amount convection (where air adjacent to the worktop becomes hot and transfers that heat into the timber), but I can't see any way to significantly reduce radiation heat going into the worktop other than by covering the worktop immediately next to the hob with some sort of removable, insulated, reflective covers whilst you are cooking. Maybe a bit of experimentation is in order in conjunction with an IR thermometer (gun type) and some silver foil to see if it makes any difference

Frankly, I am rather surprised that your kitchen designer didn't take this issue into consideration when designing the kitchen and instead recommended a worktop made from something like granite, concrete or quartz instead of wood. I am aware that Corian (solid surface) and laminates can also discolour if installed too close to a high output gas hob and should therefore be avoided when installing wok burners and the like.
 
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wood is an attractive material, and very suitable for any room that does not contain water, taps, kettles, glasses, hot pans or cookers.

it's OK in a kitchen showroom, but not in a kitchen.
 
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Thanks yes it is an inset hob - I planned and fitted the kitchen myself. I didn't rally think of the radiating heat from the burner! I like wood, we had it in our old house. It suits the house / decor and its something I could do myself. We don't use the gas that often, I'll see what type of heat shield I can find or even make for when the gas is used. Perhaps a foil wrapped wooden toblerone shaped block will work. good idea of using an IR gun to see the heat temp.

Better not tell the wife about the problems with wood... Too late to change it now! maybe in a few years after we've had some use out of it :)
 
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Wood darkening could be oils from cooking starting to stain the worktop.Doubt it’s heat related , any pics.
 
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I wonder if a glass worktop saver on each side would help.
 
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In the new kitchen we have an oak worktop and a flush fitted duel fuel Hob.

its been coated with osmo oil, but after a few months use we are noticing the wood is darkening (not massively but it is noticeable) close to the gas burner.

Its a pretty powerful gas burner - 6kw according to the spec. On its lowest setting its probably as powerful as the big burner on our old Hob!

I will sand and re-oil the worktop, but what can I put on it to protect it from the heat on that side when it is used? perhaps a strip of stainless steel?

Is it a Fisher and Paykel flush fitted hob?


In the above they say that the worktop should be made of a heat resistant material.

I guess you might be able to route out a wider rectangle and use granite or something similar (with the flush hob sitting in that). I hope tht makes sense.

Additionally did you leave a small gap for the. heat resistant silicone seal (where the edge of the hob meets the timber). The silicone is supposed to be rated to 150 degrees c. I would have thought that the silicone would help to insulate the timber from the heat.

Can you post photos?

BTW, if it is the Fisher and Paykel, it is gorgeous.
 

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