Radiator or plinth heater

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Hi. My flat roofed kitchen (17sqm/40cubic m) is very cold and I want to get some heating in. I have a tiled floor with WarmUp underfloor heating which I'm using to take the edge off but I'm wary about the running costs. The biggest radiator I can find to fit the narrow wall space has a BTU of 3112, whereas the calculator tells me I need 6000 (http://www.bestheating.com/btu-calculator)

Plinth heaters seem to come recommended but against them is they're dust traps, there's a bit of noise from the fan and they can get sludged up.

I'm assuming an electric plinth heater is too expensive to run so I'm wondering whether my best bet is a hydronic plinth heater or the undersized radiator. Would the fan need an FCU or could I just plug it in? I have an available space on a double socket but not an FCU. Any advice or recommendations appreciated. Thanks.
 
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Newboy

I have a similar kitchen (flat roof and chilly) and fitted the Myson hydrdonic with remote (wired) stat and controller a couple of years ago.

Very happy with performance, even on lowest fan speed the room is significantly warmer than before. There used to be a rad on wall but air/heat circulation was poor.
 
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Thanks for that, the plumber mentioned Myson. Hadn't considered the air circulation. Is you fan hardwired or plugged in?
 
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Whilst in theory, you could put a plug on it, the plinth heater should really be wired to a room thermostat (see newboy's post above) as per Part L of the Building Regulations. Myson make one specifically designed for the Kickspace.

In any case it makes sense. Because, first of all, you won't have to grovel around on your hands and knees to operate it, and secondly the plinth heater has an integral sensor that detects when the heating comes 'on' and starts the fan. Without a thermostat, the heat output is uncontrolled and you could easily come down* in the morning to an overheated kitchen. You could of course operate it manually (on your hands and knees) as required, but then you would't have a nice warm kitchen first thing in the morning.

You will also need a good flow of water available from your heating system. Because of the fan assistance, Plinth Heaters are very efficient at getting the heat out of the water and require a really good flow rate. Myson instructions specifically state "It is not recommended that this unit is used to replace a radiator in an existing system unless an adequate flow of water can be guaranteed." Your plumber will be able to confirm this for you.

* I'm assuming here that you don't live in a bungalow or a flat ;)
 
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Thanks for the info. It'll be a new addition to the CH system and as far as I low there aren't any issues with the flow. I hadn't considered the thermostat. I don't want to start chasing channels in the wall - could the cable run in trunking inside a kitchen cupboard? If that's not allowed maybe the simplest solution is a radiator.
 
N

Newboy

Supply cable can be hidden inside units back to a fused spur.

Thermostat needs to mounted in the area specified by the manufacturer - away from doorways/draughts etc. I suppose that you could use trunking and a surface mount box for the thermostat/controller. It depends on how important aesthetics are to you.
 
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Was thinking I could put the thermostat on the side of a full length cupboard.

I spoke to Myson who said that I didn't need to have a thermostat. Says it comes on and off with the boiler (subject to a minimum temperature of water) or I could switch it off manually. I suppose it's the equivalent of having a radiator without a TRV.
 
N

Newboy

. Says it comes on and off with the boiler (subject to a minimum temperature of water) or I could switch it off manually.

Not quite the way it works. There is a thermostat on the pipework inside the unit, providing the (pipe) water temperature is high enough then the unit will run continuously, when the (pipe) water temp drops then the unit will switch off.

Was thinking I could put the thermostat on the side of a full length cupboard

Sounds like a reasonable idea - and a lot easier than having to switch the unit on and off at floor level.
 

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