Re laying and Insulating York stone floor

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Hello, I’m currently stripping back to stone my living room in an 1820s cottage. The cottage is of solid stone construction.

I have removed the floor coverings (modern laminate) and discovered wet or damp concrete screed. I’ve removed the screens to reveal a second screed patially covered in bitumin paint.

On removing the 2nd screed I’ve got back to the original York stone floor which I’m hoping I can clean in keep. However it’s very cold under foot.

I’m considering lifting it up after carefully mapping it out, digging down and installing some insulation in the form of a floating floor. Sand blinding, dpm, pri boards, visqueen, concrete slab. Then re laying the York stone.

I’ve read contradictory information that this is a good thing to do. And also bad. The reason for it being bad is that the dpm prevents the floor breathing as it would have originally done. I’m not sure omitting the dpm would make much difference as the pri and polythene below the slab would also act in the same way and push the moisture sideways anyway.

I appreciate the existing concrete screed and bitumin would have caused the same issue but I’d prefer to do this right rather can cause more issues.

Any advice greatly received.
 
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Breathing is internet nonsense.

Why would you want a floor to breathe damp air into the room you sit and watch the TV in?

You need a barrier to damp. Polythene.
 
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Breathing is internet nonsense.

Why would you want a floor to breathe damp air into the room you sit and watch the TV in?

You need a barrier to damp. Polythene.
I think that’s my point. There is so much conflicting info. And you are correct. I wouldn’t want that, however in old houses with no air bricks, cavity walls or dpc. there seems to be many ‘experts’ who advise against modern materials such as gypsum and concrete because it traps moisture.

When they were built the fire was most likely on all the time and windows and doors were poorly sealed so drafts and airflow was common place. Nine times out of 10 damp issues are down to poor ventilation, that could be interpreted as not allowing materials to breathe.

I’m not saying I’m right, but I’m looking for some informed advice. While there is a world of crap online there must be an expert in older houses who can clarify.
 

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