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Rear extension 6m neighbour objecting

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by Alphatiger, 3 Jun 2016.

  1. Alphatiger

    Alphatiger

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    Hi, my semi-detached neighbour has had a 3m single storey rear extension for 15 years and I now wish to do a 6m one under permitted development. I reckon they will object due to 'loss of amenity', however what is the probability of my proposal being declined? At the end of the day they will only see 3m of our wall, live I've had all these years.
     
  2. tony1851

    tony1851

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    If any neighbour objects, the council will look at the proposal and come to a decision themselves.
    They will only consider the issue of amenity, and as your neighbour already has a 3m extension, it's quite possible
    that they would conclude that there was no loss of amenity.
     
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  3. Footsoldier888

    Footsoldier888

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    A big factor in general is the orientation of the sun with overshadowing being strong grounds for refusal on rear extensions.

    I think the problem is when they don't get much sun plus your extension would cast more shadow. Which hopefully isn't the case.

    If they have a wide rear window that helps too I think because the overshadow effect is reduced.
     
  4. napoleondynamite

    napoleondynamite

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    Whether it will be overbearing/enclosing for the neighbour is probably a greater concern than potential overshadowing.

    The short answer is shove the application in and see what happens. You can appeal if prior approval is refused.

    Are you submitting full drawings or just a block plan? Full drawings would give the neighbours and the Council more certainty as to what is proposed. If you just put a block plan in they will have to consider the ptontial 'worst case' design you could build based on the plan and your measurements.
     
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  5. unclebob1

    unclebob1

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    I was in a similar situation,
    Neighbor has an existing 2.75m extension. I applied for 6m, neighbor objected due to loss of light etc.
    Reapplied with 5.75m (3m longer then neighbors), same objection but council approved as there was no more loss of light.

    In my case, the sun rises at the front of my house, on my side, but sets on the back, on the neighbors side. so realistically no loss of light, but a gain of a higher wall in place of a short wooden fence.

    Best i can suggest is if your not time pushed to get plans approved, and your architect is willing, submit 6m, if rejected submit a bit smaller...

    You don't pay to submit, your only really paying for the time for architect to draw/submit, and time each one takes to apply and get a response.

    May also be worth speaking to the neighbor and see what they may be happy with! After my objections, i spent time with the neighbour discussing the finish and agreed with them as to what they would be happy with... (assuming you want to stay in the good books with them!) eg a bodged brick finish as the builder had no access vs a nice clean finish as they had access and time to do the job properly, and clean up after themselves...
     
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  6. Nakajo

    Nakajo

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    Light isn't (or isn't just) sunlight. Daylight's just as important - hence the '45 degree' rule(-of-thumb)
     
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