1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Removing this chimney stack!

Discussion in 'Building' started by EzioSuffolk, 28 Dec 2019.

  1. EzioSuffolk

    EzioSuffolk

    Joined:
    23 Dec 2019
    Messages:
    21
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi, I’m planning a single storey extension, and want to remove this chimney stack that will (otherwise) be towering over it, and possibly be dropping debris on its roof.

    Hopefully these images appear correctly...

    IMAGES ARE NOW IN NEW POST BELOW!!

    I can either remove the stack until just below the roof tiles (and then making good), or possibly there’s a reasonably cheap way to remove the whole chimney stack down to ground level? Doing this would give more flexibility/space in accessing the extension, rather than needing to ‘work or walk round’ the chimney column.

    How feasible is the latter option? Thanks for any advice.
     
    Last edited: 28 Dec 2019
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. bobasd

    bobasd

    Joined:
    2 Dec 2017
    Messages:
    1,885
    Thanks Received:
    281
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    the (IMG) photos wont open?
    the c/stack business you ask about - theres lots of info on here: see Related Threads below and use search button.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. catlad

    catlad

    Joined:
    29 Jul 2011
    Messages:
    3,713
    Thanks Received:
    505
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I can't see any images!
     
  5. EzioSuffolk

    EzioSuffolk

    Joined:
    23 Dec 2019
    Messages:
    21
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  6. EzioSuffolk

    EzioSuffolk

    Joined:
    23 Dec 2019
    Messages:
    21
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Photos now included!

    I’m asking how easy / sensible is it to remove the whole height of the chimney stack in order to create flexibility when building/knocking through to a new, single floor extension to be built on the rear of the house.
    As you can see from the full height photo, the stack ‘half sticks out’ from the house itself.
     
  7. EzioSuffolk

    EzioSuffolk

    Joined:
    23 Dec 2019
    Messages:
    21
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Note, I’ll obviously have the old ‘black’ down pipe beside the chimney stack removed too.
     
  8. Sponsored Links
  9. bobasd

    bobasd

    Joined:
    2 Dec 2017
    Messages:
    1,885
    Thanks Received:
    281
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    thanks for sorting the pics.

    you have an external, projecting chimney breast.
    given the dimensions of the stack - 18" x 18" - the stack presumably contains a single flue from a fireplace on the ground floor.
    its a straightforward job to remove the stack and c/breast.
    the SVP projection above the roof plane is also a simple job to drop below the eaves line.

    after the brickwork of the c/breast has been removed the old flue line will possibly be soot impregnated.it must be cleaned off.

    the internal fire place opening will have to be blocked off.

    its not an easy or safe job for a DIY'er - perhaps get the extn builder to do the work? but its sensible to do as you propose.

    whether you intend to do this work or use a professional, there's quite a few red flags showing on your pics?
    chimney, SVP and extn must all be considered together or you will run into grief.

    come back on here if you want any more advice?
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  10. EzioSuffolk

    EzioSuffolk

    Joined:
    23 Dec 2019
    Messages:
    21
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks Bobasd.

    If the whole chimney stack is removed, will it disturb the internal walls within the house, especially in the bathroom area?
    I.e. is the whole 18”x18” section of brickwork removed, or is it just the part of the stack that projects out from the house that’s removed?

    BTW, the chimney stack hasn’t been used for ages and has (somehow) been blocked off / covered up in the fireplace opening behind kitchen units
     
  11. stuart45

    stuart45

    Joined:
    13 Sep 2008
    Messages:
    2,833
    Thanks Received:
    379
    Location:
    Somerset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The inner skin of the cavity should be separate from the face brickwork, so it's likely that the brickwork can be taken down and made good. You can never be 100% sure from a photo though. I'm guessing that chimney could have been from a floor standing boiler or back outlet stove due to it's size and it's in the kitchen.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  12. Nige F

    Nige F

    Joined:
    28 Jun 2005
    Messages:
    20,118
    Thanks Received:
    1,495
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    +1 : and the soot door gives a clue where the stovepipe entered inside
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  13. 23vc

    23vc

    Joined:
    17 Apr 2015
    Messages:
    1,615
    Thanks Received:
    220
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I used to have a similar thing on mine. It goes down the corner of a first floor room, then terminates on a big cast conc. slab at first floor height.
    I hate those thin chimneys, the wind caught the (massive old skool) tv Ariel on mine, rotated the top 8 courses of bricks by 45 degrees, and almost sent it through my kids bedroom ceiling. I rebuilt it to a lower height. Hardest part of taking it down was managing the concrete slab on the top which had rebar in it
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. catlad

    catlad

    Joined:
    29 Jul 2011
    Messages:
    3,713
    Thanks Received:
    505
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    It was probably the rebar that saved you!
     
    • Like Like x 2
Sponsored Links
Loading...

Share This Page