1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Replacing Double Glazing in a door

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by RobFJ, 25 Jun 2019.

  1. RobFJ

    RobFJ

    Joined:
    18 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    32
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The two panels (c1980) of a fully glazed, outside door have badly blown and need replacing. They are secured with painted wooden glazing beads. Needless to say air gap of the existing panels is minimal but all timbers are very sound

    The door only accesses an unheated boot room so there is no requirement for anything fancy in terms of the spec of the glass

    I'm pretty adept at replacing and puttying in single glazed units but this is a first time for me to swap a double glazed panel with wooden beads.

    Any inside advice would be appreciated on the glass I should order + fitting the new ones (assuming they are thicker than the current ones).

    Thanks in advance.

    Rob
     
  2. Notch7

    Notch7

    Joined:
    15 Sep 2017
    Messages:
    10,563
    Thanks Received:
    911
    Location:
    Sussex
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    you just need toughened, clear, aluminium spacer bar, spacer bar thickness and overall unit thickness (for example 4-12-4 20mm overall)

    buy a replacement unit the same thickness -you can get dg units 12mm, 14mm, 16mm, 18mm, 20mm, 24mm, 28mm

    ideally a unit should be smaller than the tight size by 4mm or 5mm all round -however you will be governed by the glass rebate. the spacer bar is generally around 12mm wide so with a 4mm gap you would need a 16mm rebate.

    You can make the gap all round a bit smaller but always keep the gap at the bottom at least 4mm or 5mm.

    when fitting the new unit, use glazing shims (they are usually 28mm wide these days so just but a little pack and cut off short pieces the unit thickness.

    I would recommend wet glazing with neutral cure silicone. Dont fill the gap all round, make a 6mm dia bead all round and push on the glazing beads and allow the silicone to squish out a bit.

    on the bottom bead put silicon on the back of the bead where it pushes against the glass -so it will stop water running down the glass and getting in.

    a couple of tips -
    before putting unit in -paint rebates, back of glazing beads, mitres
    before putting the unit in, put in a line of silicone in the 4 corners -it helps stop any water getting into the joints
    and if you are really keen, cut a couple of slots out of the underside of the bottom bead -it creates drainage so any water getting in will run out rather than get trapped and encourage the unit to break down prematurely.
     
  3. RobFJ

    RobFJ

    Joined:
    18 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    32
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Tx /Notch7/ - very helpful and just what I was lookling for :)

    Tx again.

    R
     
Loading...

Share This Page