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Replacing UPVC front door/sidelights

Discussion in 'Building' started by belfastjohn, 17 Dec 2020.

  1. belfastjohn

    belfastjohn

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    Basically I want to know if UPVC door/sidelights are suitable replacements and if so how they should be fitted. See photos for details. As you can see the floor has a raised central concrete plinth upon which the original door sat, which sits back from where the original sidelights would have sat. The unit I'm replacing was butted up against the door plinth and is only supported at the sides. The expanding foam is just a temp measure because there is so much flex in the unit, it leaks there, is difficult to open/close/and lock. Is a UPVC unit suitable for this situation, can it be adapted to suit or would I be best returning it to the original setup where I think the door would have sat slightly back from the sidelights? Many Thanks
     

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  3. oldbutnotdead

    oldbutnotdead

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    Thats a right lashup, typical for sales led dg fitters.
    You could have a setback with dg units (something like bay poles and link strips) or you could just bin the concrete off and fix the whole lot to the floor
     
  4. diy_fun_uk

    diy_fun_uk

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    If you like the extra floorspace gained, go with the same door/side unit setup but ensure the very obvious gap outside (below door section of the frame) is properly filled. Equally, if the extra floorspace isn't required, why not go with the same door/side unit setup but pull the entire thing inwards x inches in line with the original top concrete step riser. The concrete that's been added later could then be removed. I'd keep the setup flush but decide if you want it forwards or backwards if that makes sense.
     
  5. belfastjohn

    belfastjohn

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    Thanks for the replies. I have considered the options mentioned, but they aren't without their issues. I think when that was originally fitted (long before I bought the house) they intended resting it on the outer concrete plinths but then realized the door wouldn't open because the inner concrete step at the door sits about 2.5cm above the concrete sides, so they've raised it up and slapped some cement under it to fill the gap.
    And off course you can't get a straight technical answer out of DG salesmen. All say what a terrible job it is but can't explain how they'll overcome it, and who say they cant send out (what they call) a surveyor until I pay a 20% deposit. That ain't happening. Starting to think a good old fashioned joinery firm might be my safest option.
     
  6. 23vc

    23vc

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    Using a small/one man local window fitter should avoid the deposit/surveyor issue, I wouldn’t go near the big national firms
     
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  8. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    A local guy will also be much cheaper/do a better job. That is a terrible botch, it looks like DIY gone very wrong.
     
  9. diy_fun_uk

    diy_fun_uk

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    Tbh your options kind of remain as per my earlier post. If you want to retain the floorspace, engage with a local reputable glazing company and ask how they'd tackle re-doing the current bodge. If you're happy enough for the new unit to be further in i.e. original front aspect, the concrete bodge can simply be removed. It shouldn't be a major issue for a semi-competent tradesperson to make good the bodge if you want to retain the floorspace. As others have touched on, avoid the big companies, doesn't equate to better advice or workmanship :)
     
  10. belfastjohn

    belfastjohn

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    Agree; seems I've a couple of options with regards to positioning, but both require building up or removing concrete to get a level base. I guess building up all round would be the better option. However, I think I'll get in touch with the joinery firm that built my new staircase, because I know they do quality work, with a view to returning the entrance to how it would have been when the house was built. Looking at a neighbours who recently had his done with wooden frames (haven't managed to speak to him yet), the sidelights sit flush with the concrete plinths either side whilst the front door sits flush with the recessed step in the middle. I'd have thought it could be replicated with uPVC, but getting a DG company to confirm that is proving more difficult than I thought!
     
  11. Notch7

    Notch7

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    A joinery shop could easily make the set back, If that's what you want.

    Obviously timber will be 2 or 3 times dearer......timber feature entrance doors look a million times better than upvc, you wouldn't be disappointed.

    you would probably get a technically knowledgable person from a jounery shop, those sort of complications is what the deal with all the time
     
  12. diy_fun_uk

    diy_fun_uk

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    If I'm picturing what you want to achieve correctly, I see no reason why it can't be achieved in UPVC/composite. As Notch advised, timber's another option and can be more aesthetically pleasing as long as you're comfortable with the additional maintenance. However composite can also be considered. Regardless of material, it should be achievable.

    Let us know how you get on.
     
  13. DIYnot Local

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