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Splitting Sky and TV feeds into multiple rooms

Discussion in 'Audio Visual' started by Naz1977, 19 May 2019.

  1. Naz1977

    Naz1977

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    Hi All

    After some advise.

    I have done an extensive renovation of my house and now want to run some cables for both aerial and Sky feed into the bedrooms.

    The TVs we have some are freeview and some are Freesat enabled, therefore the need for both Dish feed and also an aerial feed.

    I have a dish with a quad output LNB on it and also a high gain antenna

    I have drilled them both into the loft from outside, so now have a single feed from aerial and a twin feed from LNB.

    House is a converted bungalow with dormers and bedrooms upstairs.

    I think I will need 8 pairs of Sky feed to go to the 8 different locations and also 8 Aerial feeds in to the same locations.

    What hardware do I need to split the above 2?

    I have seen the F splitter, but I assume that will not be good enough as it will weaken the signal if split 8 ways?

    Thanks for the advise in advance
     
  2. flameport

    flameport

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    As a minimum, a 16 output multiswitch
    An example: https://www.triax.uk/products/satel...stand-alone-4sat-1ter-psu-16out-lte-protected
    Other manufacturers are available.

    5 inputs - 4 sat and 1 terrestrial.
    16 outputs, which can be used for either or both, a diplex outlet plate is required at the other end to split the sat/tv signals.
    Note that this is not compatible with Sky Q, and the selection of channels on Freesat and Freeview is rather similar, so do you really need both Freesat and Freeview at every location?

    Useless.
     
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  3. Lucid

    Lucid

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    Why is it so often after a renovation that someone then considers TV distribution? Why not during or even before??

    As @flameport said, an F splitter for satellite is useless. The reason is that the sat receivers direct the connected LNB (there are 4 in a Quad) based on high or low voltage and either horizontal or vertical polarisation to match the channel group which contains the station you wish to watch. Splitting the signal from one LNB two ways and watching the same on two different displays, there'll come a time sooner or later when one receiver calls for a different combination of voltage and polarity to the other. At that point, one of the displays is going to come up with a no signal warning.

    The multiswitch mentioned above gets around this by using a modified LNB referred to as a Quattro. This provides all four voltage and polarity combinations simultaneously to the switch, and it's the switch that then serves the appropriate choice to the satellite receiver.

    Sky HD will work with a multiswitch and Quattro LNB. For Sky Q it's pointless* since the main box is the only one in a Q system that has the F connectors for LNB feeds. There rest of the boxes use data networking (wired or wireless) to feed off the main box. Where you've got Sky multiroom right now, it would pay you to have a look at the Sky Q version of multiroom.


    * unless you want Sky Q and Freesat, but that wouldn't make a lot of sense for many installs.

    If this or any other reply was helpful to you, then do the decent thing and click the T-H-A-N-K-S button. It appears when you hover the mouse pointer near the Quote Multi-quote buttons. This is the proper way to show your thanks for the time and help someone gave you.
     
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  4. winston1

    winston1

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    Although a multiswitch is often recommended, especially for large instals, I would just go for 2 dishes each with an octal LNB. This would give you 8 pairs of outputs.

    For terrestrial, depending on your local signal strength, it may be possible to split 8 ways, but if not a distribution amplifier will be required in the loft. I hope your extensive renovation included a 13 amp socket in the loft.
     
  5. Naz1977

    Naz1977

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    Sorry perhaps I wasn't clear enough . The refusbishment at the moment has been purely the outside of property, with dormer extension and ...

    Nothing has been done to the inside. All the walls and .. still needs to be put up. So I am looking to do this before the walls are put up so I can hide the cables and ... everywhere

    Thanks
     
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  6. Naz1977

    Naz1977

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    2 dishes?! no way! Mrs will have kittens!
     
  7. Naz1977

    Naz1977

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    So the multi switch is around £220 cheapest I can see with the item you have listed.

    Isn't there any cheaper options?

    Would something like this work? https://www.electricaldirect.co.uk/....recs1&rrStrat=ClickCP&rrItem=2#specification

    I know it is only 8 output, but am thinking if I get 2 of those, then I can feed the LNB to 2 separate units. So if one fails, the other still works ? That way have a bit of resilience?
     
  8. winston1

    winston1

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    Yes. Persuade your misses not to have kittens and use two dishes.

    No that is for terrestrial distribution. The LNB in out is just an amplifier not multiswitch distribution.
     
  9. Naz1977

    Naz1977

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    As you see in the intial post, some of the TVs only support antenna input and not LNB input!

    If I install 2 dishes, how can I get the Free to air channels down the normal aerial?
     
  10. Naz1977

    Naz1977

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  11. winston1

    winston1

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    You either run a separate cabe for the aerial or else use sat/terrestrial combiner at the top and a sat/terrestrial splitter at the TV.
     
  12. winston1

    winston1

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    Looks a possibility.

    Switching commands: 13 V, 18 V, 13 V/ 22 kHz, 18/22 kHz come from the satellite box.

    You will still need a satellite/terrestrial splitter at the TV.
     
  13. Lucid

    Lucid

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    "How would a multiswitch know which signal to send down each output port?" because it mimics the behaviour of the LNB.

    Each wire going to the 'lump' on the end of the 'stick' on the satellite dish is connecting to one LNB. When you had Sky+/Sky+HD installed, they knew you'd need at least two feeds to run a recorder box, and they hoped to sell you multiroom as well, so it made sense to install a quad (4 output) LNB device. That means the lump has 4 individually addressable LNBs. Two are used for the recorder box, and the remaining two are/were for enhancements to your Sky system (IOW flogging more subscription services).

    Without getting bogged-down in the technicalities of single LNB mode, for most of us, having a Quad LNB means it's possible to run two Sky+/Sky+HD recorder boxes, or one recorder and two feeds that can watch any available channels independently. What it's not possible to do with satellite is to split one LNB feed and watch two programmes that are on different channel groups as defined by the polarity and frequency.

    The difference with a multiswitch (when combined with a Quattro LNB) is that all four signal groups are available together; that's the multi part of multiswitch. What happens is the switch bit of it sends which ever of the four signal groups is required when there's a satellite tuner sitting at the end of the wire. It's a bit more than that though because a multiswitch normally has more than just four outputs. There are 8-way, 16-way, 24-way and so on; so the mutliswitch is also a distribution amplifier. What that means is if 6 satellite tuners all need the same signal group, they can all have it.


    "or if normal digital signal from the Terresterial antenna is required?"

    Firstly, a satellite receiver tuner will ignore a signal from a TV aerial, and a TV tuner will ignore a signal from an LNB, much in the same was as both ignore and stray signals that aren't within each tuner's reception band.

    Second, multiple signals can be sent down the same piece of wire and still remain distinct. They're all just part of the spectrum of signals we refer to as radio frequency signals. We use this phenomenon to combine the signals from a TV aerial, and a radio aerial, and a satellite LNB signal, then send the whole lot down a single wire to a filter that then splits them out to the individual components again just as if they travelled down three separate wires.

    Remember I wrote that the multiswitch mimics the behaviour of an LNB? Well, LNBs are active devices. They're 'driven' from the satellite receiver to make them change state between receiving the four different channel groups. Each of the LNBs in a Quad is driven by the voltage sent by the satellite receiver (13V or 18V) and whether there's a 22 kHz tone present. Tht's how the multiswitch knows which of the four satellite signals to send down the wire. The TV signal is there too, multiplexed in with the satellite signal. Each tuner type 'listens' for its particular range of signal.

    If this or any other reply was helpful to you, then do the decent thing and click the T-H-A-N-K-S button. It appears when you hover the mouse pointer near the Quote Multi-quote buttons. This is the proper way to show your thanks for the time and help someone gave you.
     
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