Staining over front door

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Hey all,

Hoping to get some advice from one of the pros on this. Decided to look into staining my front door (see attachments). I tested on a small area and after lightly sanding I applied the stain but small discrepancies are appearing through. If I sanded deeper, then the resulting marks would also show through. Outside of priming the whole door is there anything anyone can advise?

Thanks
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I'm sure a pro will be along soon, but in the meantime:
Is that a solid hardwood door?
How did you sand?
Which stain did you use, and how did you apply it? The faults you've circled look white.
 
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I presume that's veneer.

The marks look to me like dust, apart from the one in the corner that looks like a scuff.

Are you using a clear or a tinted stain? Tinted will obscure the grain.

Why does it meet treating?

Where the original treatment has been scuffed off to expose bare wood, recolour it with a spirit-based (not water) wood dye such as Rustins, and then a colourless varnish or stain.

Yours might need a "teak" colour or "mahogany" though it is not deep red.
 
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I presume that's veneer.

The marks look to me like dust, apart from the one in the corner that looks like a scuff.

Are you using a clear or a tinted stain? Tinted will obscure the grain.

Why does it meet treating?

Where the original treatment has been scuffed off to expose bare wood, recolour it with a spirit-based (not water) wood dye such as Rustins, and then a colourless varnish or stain.

Yours might need a "teak" colour or "mahogany" though it is not deep red.

Thanks for the reply. What colour does this look like to you, it’s the outside of the door?
 

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it might be a "mahogany" substitute (various tropical red hardwoods are often inaccurately described with this name) but it is not the "red mahogany" often seen on Victorian furniture.


Teak starts pink but oxides to a warm colour like a brown with some orange in it.

The wood dyes you can buy are just made up with various mixtures and intensities of red, brown, yellow and black. The final colour depends on the colour and absorbency of the timber you are treating.

Dye is not very expensive you can can try a few on spare timber. If you are quick, you can clean it off (mostly) with white spirit. Surprisingly, "Wilko" shops have an own brand (probably made for them by one of the big makers) that seems good quality and value. Also Rustins and Blackfriars. I have not used Liberon but they have a good reputation. Colron not so good now as they are trying to push their water-based "refined" dyes, but I like their spirit-based dyes.

Examples:

https://www.wilko.com/en-uk/decorating-diy/paint-woodcare/interior-paint-woodcare/interior-wood-paint-stain-varnish/interior-wood-stain/c/1406?q=:relevance:type:Wood+Dye

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Lots of great replies guys thanks. So to be clear, if I wanted to keep the grain I would need to use a solvent based dye, possibly Mahogany? That way it would cover the discrepancies unlike water based which wouldn't. Does that sound right? I'm competent enough at DIY I've just never tackled a job like this before.
 
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the colour looks to me more like a teak dye. You can mix them if you want, for for a tiny spot it will not show much.

apply a clear varnish or stain over the top. Use the tip of an artists paintbrush for little chips or scratches so there is no blob.

If you know the door maker, ask them what products they used in the factory.
 
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Thanks John. I’ve ordered some teak dye.

The door looks teal on the outside and mahogany on the inside doesn’t it?
 
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