Stiff Speedfit pipe

J

JonasX

I recently used some Speedfit PEX pipe. The stuff is so stiff and unworkable it was slower to install than copper and looked awful. Some of it I stripped out and put copper in. Even after pouring inside boiling water to soften the pipe, the stuff could never be straight. I will not be using this stuff ever again. Does anyone know a more flexible "quality" plastic pipe?
 
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Speedfit Polybutylene.
Speedfit coils of Polybutylene barrier pipe have extra flexibility making them easy to handle on site. Manufactured in the UK by John Guest Speedfit. The pipe is ideal for long runs where a softer pipe material is an advantage.

Speedfit PEX does come in 2, 3 and 6 metre straight lengths, you know.
 
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Best to install it where it isn't seen. I ran a system down from the loft and used those 'clasp' type pipe clips to hold it in place. If you use the 'u-shaped' clips, it'll ping out again and smack you in in the face! For the ornamental or more skilled stuff, as someone said, you can buy straight lengths.
 
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J

JonasX

For straight lengths I can buy copper, which I did with Conex fittings. It looks better than plastic. ;)

The non-barrier plastic pipe is softer then, meaning I can't use this on a CH system only the hot and cold water. I am beginning to think is all this plastic stuff worth the hassle and effort.
 
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Most professionals prefer copper.

I dont understand why you expect that there will be any advantages in using copper.

Plastic only has two application advantages, installation in single lengths in concrete and installation where it needs to be threaded through difficult places where the flexibility and long lengths are important.

Tony
 
J

JonasX

I can see many advantages in using copper.

I would say using plastic in concrete may be troublesome, as it was near impossible to get the stuff to go where I wanted it.
 
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Copper can not be obtained in lengths more than 3 m normally.

Joints in copper pipe buried in concrete are a common failure point.

Copper needs to be protected from corrosion in concrete.

Copper expands when hot and needs allowance for that expansion.

So....

What problem do you see with plastic pipe in concrete floors?
 
J

JonasX

"it was near impossible to get the stuff to go where I wanted it."
 
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You need to use the right material for the right job.

Plastic looks awful no matter how you install it - unless you clip it every 12" or so.

I tend to use copper when it is exposed, and plastic when it isn't.

Mechanical joints should be accessible anyway.
 
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Copper can not be obtained in lengths more than 3 m normally.
I've got 6 metre lengths and 20 metre coils, both plain and plastic coated in stock, 15, 22 and 28mm. 2 to 3 days to any part of the country. To merchants only. It's readily available.....if your merchant can be bothered to make the effort.
 
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Each has benefits, and almost everyone uses copper for finish work.

But don't disregard plastic - for long runs in the loft, behind skirting, under the floor etc it's perfect. Can be fished in one length, strung airbourne - it's a lot quicker to lay.

Also - it withstands freezing, which copper doesn't. Ok, the pushfits may pop off which can lead to damage so take that into account, but the pipe will be fine.

Like any building material - use the right stuff for your particular job. One size does not fit all.
 
J

JonasX

"for long runs in the loft, behind skirting, under the floor etc it's perfect."

Maybe I was using the wrong stuff. Speedfit was so stiff it could not flex anywhere. If bent it just went back to its original coiled shape. :(
 
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That's why Speedfit do polybutylene, too. It has less 'memory' than PEX.
 
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You are actually uncoiling it by unrolling and not simply lifting the coils off the roll as they are, aren't you?

Speedfit is fairly stiff, but if not unrolled it will keep trying to twist back on itself.
 

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