Temporary Fire Doors

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I am refurbing my house, including a loft extension, and as such I understand that I need fire doors between the hall & kitchen. The doors (glazed double doors with sidelights) have been delayed due to production issues. therefore I have installed the frame and some temporary doors (also FD30).

Is there any reason why this wouldn't be Ok for Building Regs?; might the BCO see that these are obviously temporary and want to wait until they are replaced?

FD30.JPG
 
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Leofric

If building control are already involved they will tell you.
 
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If they are firedoors built in accordance with the required BRs you have done what is required and the BCO should be satisfied, for all he knows you could rip them out as soon as its all been signed off anyway
 
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Ok, thanks. We did have to extend the frame (using PAR), so he may have an issue with this.
 
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Why don't/didn't you just wait for the proper doors to arrive before getting the final sign off?
 
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Leofric

If they are firedoors built in accordance with the required BRs you have done what is required and the BCO should be satisfied, for all he knows you could rip them out as soon as its all been signed off anyway
I think the question is whether the fire doors as built do comply with bldg. regs :!: For all anybody knows there might be a fire and somebody could burn to death because the fire doors had been ripped out.
 
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My builder is liaising with BC, but
Why don't/didn't you just wait for the proper doors to arrive before getting the final sign off?

Mainly due to timing/convenience/risk mitigation.

Our project is due to reach reaches practical completion next week; and we are due to move in the week after. I think it is better for both us and our builder that the house refurb has full building control sign off and a certificate issued and this would have held that up (I am supplying the doors / getting them fitted as they are custom and the builder couldn't find any suitable).
 
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Strictly, you should get any replacement fire doors recertified, to confirm that they are fitted correctly in accordance with the manufacturer's test certification.
 
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I wouldn't have thought the inspector could refuse to sign something off because you might make non compliant chances later. He might mention on a personal level that fire doors are provided for an extremely good reason, but I doubt his personal suspicion would come into it. Building control do have enforcement powers on non compliances for a year after the work is done, and if something is dangerous, the powers never expire. Although I'm guessing they're more used for people undermining their foundations or dangerous electrical installations.
 
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I wouldn't have thought the inspector could refuse to sign something off because you might make non compliant chances later. He might mention on a personal level that fire doors are provided for an extremely good reason, but I doubt his personal suspicion would come into it. Building control do have enforcement powers on non compliances for a year after the work is done, and if something is dangerous, the powers never expire. Although I'm guessing they're more used for people undermining their foundations or dangerous electrical installations.
The inspector will sign off whatever he sees on the day, if it's compliant on the day.

The issue is, fire door sets are controlled fittings and so should not be changed unless its to the same standard. Ok, fit another fire door, but then who is checking the installation? The ironmongery, the fittings, the strips, the manufacturer's guidance, and most importantly the gaps?

If there is a fire, and these doors don't perform then there will be questions as to who certified the installation, and if there is none as the doors were replaced, then probably no insurance cover is the very least that could happen. Potentially worse.

Fire doors are literally a hot topic ATM, and will be under intense scrutiny for years to come.

But yes, bottom line is do what you like in your own house as no one will know.

I'd be checking fire doors on a buyer's survey and confirming that they are the original ones as certified by the inspector, and not taking it for granted.
 
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