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Temporary Ground anchor suggestions please

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by jblessing, 12 Jun 2016.

  1. jblessing

    jblessing

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    Following the storms a few months ago, which destroyed both of my 24'x12' field shelters, I am keen on the replacements staying put.
    fieldshelters (1).jpg fieldshelters (2).jpg

    So, I am looking for a reasonably priced way of providing some added storm-resistance. I have looked at http://www.groundbolt.co.uk/field_shelters.html, but don't want to spend so much if I can get away with it.

    I was considering driving two fencing pin.jpg

    pins in at angles at each end and securing to the shelter with wire/chain.

    Anyone have better suggestions? Bear in mind they need to be removable.
     
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  3. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Fixing the bottom of a weak shelter to the ground will not stop it being destroyed by wind and / or heavy rain / hail. Anchoring the walls to the ground will only mean that most of the debris remains where it was and is not blown away across the field.

    Making the structure stronger and adding diagonal bracing will reduce the risk of it being broken into pieces by storm force winds. A well built shelter could survive being blown around the field without suffering much damage.
     
  4. r896neo

    r896neo

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    As bernard says your issue is not with attaching to the ground. Its more to do with constructing it specifically to resist wind racking and uplift against the roof.

    Wind will blow into the open doors and try to get out by blowing the roof off. The building will be prone to diagonal movement crushing and sagging so as bernard mentioned its important to add diagonal bracing within the stud walls and ideally sheathing the whole building in ply before cladding it. the ply sheathing is very good for adding stiffness.
     
  5. jblessing

    jblessing

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    Internally sheathed in osb. So... getting back to the subject of anchoring. Any ideas?
     
  6. SFK

    SFK

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    On the super cheap side, how about Builders Band attached at four corner posts of shed and set into four Concrete pilings.
    http://www.screwfix.com/search?search=builders+band
    BUT I agree with the others, my worry is that my method will leave you with only the four corner posts after the next storm if the rest of the structure is not suitably braced and connected. sfk
     
  7. Dave54

    Dave54

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    Just my take on the anchors: They're pricey, but they look easy to install. Most other options I can thing of involve a fair bit of digging, making concrete or using something like concrete lintel, and then buying chain, threaded bar, or builders band (as per SFK's post above) and making it all up. You might end up finding it's not that cheap anyway, and you end up with a lot of work.
    Been there on occasion! :rolleyes:
    Again, I'd agree with the others. The structure itself needs to be very strong to resist the wind.
     
  8. r896neo

    r896neo

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    The ground anchors look good and i dont really think they are terribly pricey for what they are. They are though mainly for resistant lateral movement not the lifting force your structure would experience. I would either use these would use a concrete godfather/ repair spur and bolt the wall to that.
     
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