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Tolerance behind door liner

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by Draughtsman, 14 Sep 2019.

  1. Draughtsman

    Draughtsman

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    What tolerance for packing behind the door lining should I include in a new blockwork doorway?

    How much of a gap do you leave at each side of the door liner?

    Thanks,

    Dain
     
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  3. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    We tend to ask for 10 to 15mm all round in masonry as a rule (tighter in studwork because the openings are generally far more plumb and straight) because that will limit the number of packers you'll need - but asking isn't getting, I find.......
     
  4. Draughtsman

    Draughtsman

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    15mm seems like quite a lot but I'm no expert.

    How many fixings per side would you put in?
     
    Last edited: 23 Sep 2019
  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    10mm min to 15mm max, less (say 5mm) if your brickes are bang-on. The problem is that, at least in my experience brickies don't always give you the opening you require, i.e. straight and plumb. This is especially true if they are cutting out existing masonry with a Stihl saw to create an opening. In stud walling and MF you can pretty much guarantee that it will be right and work to a 5mm tolerance. There's also the issue of fire doors where you may need about 8 to 10mm gap to form an effective fire barrier with mineral wool (foam alone is no longer permitted AFAIK). BTW 10mm packers are readily available

    Generally 3 fixings on the hinge side (ideally beneath the hinges, for which the hinge recesses need to be pre-cut and the screw holes piloted) and the same on the other side (top, just above/below the keep and near the bottom). Double-up horizontally if the door casing/lining is exceptionally wide, drilling and counterboring any visible screws so that the screw holes can be pelleted and trimmed back when you are done. Fire doors give you a bit more leeway if the masonry is ropey as the drillings can be done in the intumescent strip grooves (where they won't be seen after the strips ar installed)
     
    Last edited: 15 Sep 2019
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  7. Draughtsman

    Draughtsman

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    Last edited: 23 Sep 2019
  8. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Fixing foam give a very secure fit.
     
  9. Draughtsman

    Draughtsman

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    and a distorted frame if care isn't taken!
     
  10. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Fixing foam has no effect on frame, unless you are using balsa wood.
     
  11. DIYnot Local

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