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uPVC porch, how to join door to window, windows on a corner

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by piper64, 6 Aug 2012.

  1. piper64

    piper64

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    I'm building a porch, lower half blockwork, upper half uPVC. The blockwork is sorted, but not finished yet.

    Option 1 is to pay someone to do the uPVC installation.
    Option 2 is to do it myself.

    I'm wondering how to join the door to the windows either side. There will also be a corner made up of two windows at right angles.

    The corner will need a hidden supporting steel pillar between the blockwork and the roof as the roof is tiled. It was originally supported by a reinforced concrete post.

    Is there such a product?

    I've also trawled the net looking for reinforcing joining sections, but not really found any. Where would I get them?
     
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  3. crank39

    crank39

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    The frames are generally screwed together through the glass rebates, so once glazed the screws are invisible, apart from where top openers are situated. Screwing a window to a door is done the same way, screw the window to the door not door to window, saves seeing screws up and down the jambs when the door is open.

    For the corners we use square corner posts with reinforcing inside, for an installation like yours i would specify the reinforcing to be cut longer than the height of the frames and i would cut a square out through the cill and send the reinforcing right through so it sits on the brickwork, the outer upvc post would obviously sit on top of the cill and finish flush at the top
     
  4. piper64

    piper64

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    Cheers.
    1)I can't visualise how to screw two frames together? The screws would have to 'bite' on something, what, and of course not be so long as to interfere with the glazed panel fitment, so are there specific screws to do this?

    Is there a strip that fits over the joint to hide it?

    2)How do the frames screw together on the corner? Is the reinforced post square, so the frames fix to it?
     
  5. crank39

    crank39

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    1/ ?

    If the doors and windows are in the same elavation and side by side then they are screwed together sideways, you can also use a frame coupler to hold the frames flush but you'll still need to screw them to each other

    2/ Yes the corner post is square, hollow square section with aluminium box section within that, the frames are screwed to that in the obvious manner to form a 90 degree corner ;) , but if you have serious weight above then i would think about sending the ali through the cill and onto the brickwork
     
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  7. piper64

    piper64

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    Thanks again.

    Regarding screwing the frames together, my small experience is drilling through the plastic frame, the metal inside and into a wall, using a long drill bit and long self anchoring screws.
    You're saying that it's OK to simply screw the frames together, of course using much shorter screws, drilling through one frame into the other? I'd have imagined special bolts for this.

    Is there a specific length, size or type of screw that I'd need to use?

    I reckon I'd prefer the frame coupler idea, so these are avaialable from the plastics supplier I suppose?

    As for the roof support, a metal pole is exactly what I'd be looking for and it WOULD be fixed to the brickwork as you say. The weight of the roof, which is 30 tiles, wood structure and rendering, is supported by a single skin party wall on one end, it's fixed to the front of the house too and the other corner was supported by a concrete pole. It's propped up by a length of 6" x 2" at the moment, but is fairly secure without any propping. I wouldn't want to leave it overnight though!
     
  8. crank39

    crank39

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    There is no specific screw length as there are so many different profile widths so you need to measure the thickness of both windows butted together and decide on a screw that won't breach the second window.

    Bay pole screws are what you need, your local eurocell branch or screwfix will have various lengths of these, get the ones with the self drilling tip and the correct srewdriver bit.

    As for the coupler then you'll need to get them from the frame supplier really, its just a 'H' section trim that both frames butt up to, trapping the H between them, screw straight through the coupler.

    Use the same screws for the corner post, this is what they were designed for hence the name
     
  9. piper64

    piper64

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    Hi, I couldn't find this thread so posted another one, but here's an issue I now have which may have been answered by crank39 if I understand it correctly.

    So far:
    My porch is now re tiled with concrete tiles, originally clay. It was originally supported by a reinforced concrete pole, but I've built a metre high double skin wall which will have windows and a door.

    I was informed that I'd need a reinforced corner pole to replace the concrete one, which I've discussed with three suppliers. The windows fit to this pole, so it all looks neat.

    Today, I was talking to a supplier about a door when it was mentioned that the corner post should be a proper reinforced steel post, not simply a reinforced post. This is what crank39 was referring to I imagine?

    The difference is that a proper one is a steel post welded to a base plate which is fixed onto the blocks, which is then clad in suitable uPVC.
    A normal reinforced post is a square profile uPVC post with a metal sleeve inserted. This then sits on top of a similarly reinforced window cill. It is designed to withstand lateral load, but not vertical load.

    I again spoke to the supplier that I was going to place the order with, who maintains that a simple reinforced post is OK. He only suggested to make sure the wooden frame is securely fixed to the wall of the house.

    The weight on the roof is 28 concrete double roman tiles ( 115kg) on a wooden framework.

    Who is right? What size steel post would I need to have made if I need one?
     
  10. piper64

    piper64

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    I'm now looking towards just making sure the framework is secure and using a standard reinforced uPVC post.
    I'd like to use a load bearing post really, but although I've found a manufacturer, I can't find anyone that supplies them. I spoke to another double glazing installer yesterday who suggested that they'd use a wooden post! I've asked for an appointment, so he can see.

    Any other suggestions or advice appreciated...
     
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