What would you do...

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How would you recommend I tackle this. My house is on a slope and there’s a lot of brickwork at the back.

the render is original 30s and it’s cracked and I am worried what water is doing to those exposed brick.

I initially intended to repoint the bricks and try to render over the gaps, but I Don’t know whether it’s better to knock it all off repoint and re render.

Could you suggest how to deal for a DIY er?

I also have a gap to under the kitchen which I’ll have to deal with somehow. Suggestions on that welcome too
 

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Knock off all loose render, back to a good, straight edge and re-render. If there isn't one, re-render the lot.
It's not much fun trying to render to an indeterminate, wavy, loose edge.

There's no point in re-pointing that which you are going to render over. The 'gaps' will provide a good key for the render. Think about how a base coat is scored to provide a key for the topcoat.

The gap under the kitchen, if it's a storage area, put a door on it.
 
It needs rendering. Plain and simple.

You don't need to repoint before rerendering.
 
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It needs rendering. Plain and simple.

You don't need to repoint before rerendering.

Am I right in thinking rendering is one of
those skills left to the professionals?

most the building work I did, me and the guy I worked with could do everything but the rendering which was by a specialist.

Am I right? I’d have no idea how to get it level. My only way to attempt would be slapping on as best I can and then adding more in the dips and sanding it, like I have done with filla on interior walls
 
For the base coat, I've used 10mm thick strips of timber as guides, to allow me to cover about 1 sq meter. Then remove the strips and fill in the gaps.
If the base coat is level, the top coat is so much easier because it's thinner. But you can use the same principle for the top coat, only thinner strips.
With the correct type of sand, it's not much of a problem to feather the edges.
 
Am I right in thinking rendering is one of
those skills left to the professionals?
It depends on how flat you want it, and how good you are.

It's different to filling or plastering in that you can't keep filling dips and adding more and then rubbing it flat.

It's the opposite in fact, you build it up and then level the surface when its wet. And once it's dry that's it.

It needs to be done in two coats, and you cover the whole area at one not sections.
 
It needs to be done in two coats, and you cover the whole area at one not sections.

I'm sure you are correct, woody. I am pretty certain that's how the pros do it.
But from a DIYer to another DIYer, doing it in sections as I explained, gives perfectly acceptable results, especially if the render is painted or that rough texture applied afterwards, (forgot what it's called)
It's a technique that has worked for me on render and plaster on internal walls, render on exterior walls, and screed on floors.
They're still standing, so to speak.
 
I've tried plastering and been depressingly rubbish at it- all my efforts have either required completely redoing by a proper plasterer or intensive remedial work with a belt sander.
Rendering however, another matter- don't suppose the bits of render I've done have been glass-flat but they're flat enough and I'm quite happy to confess that I did them. If you're pebbledashing or firing that Tyrolean stuff at it then its even easier :)
 

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