Wifi extender running on electrical cables

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dependiong on the walls , construction of house - tanks/water wifi can be blocked and so a powerline adapter can be useful

I actually changed powerline for a mesh hub network - set of 3 transmitters around the house all connected by wifi - and its much much better then the powerline / wireless adapter i used to have ,
 
I have used Devolo units in the past. Work good in most situations on the same phase
 
How does 2.5mm cable, supposedly fitted decades ago, make the wifi connection stronger?

It makes use of powerline networking in some way or another (possibly by using it as backhaul between nodes?) powerline networking has existed in one way or another for at least twenty years and somehow super imposed data on the mains supply, its not liked by a lot of folk because it generally results in a lot of interference and isn't great at what it does as the cabling was never intended for that use. I'm sure I read somewhere that they are only allowed to exist by a loophole in the standards that the device can be proved to be itself emitting no interference when plugged into a filtered socket, sidestepping the fact, that with the filtered socket, it is usless for its intended purpose, and without it, it causes the supply wiring to emit quite a bit of interference.

Best bet is to go for a proper wifi mesh system, ideally one that can be set up to use ethernet cable between devices as a backhaul
 
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The powerline network adaptors have been a problem for many years, there have been attempts to ban them due to interference caused, but it is the use of them, not there manufacture which breaks the rules, so just like the bits of plastic we can plug into sockets which instead of making them safer for children make them more dangerous, they can still be sold, and in some cases we the users don't even know we have them, I think they were built into SkyQ boxes?

The use of SPD is likely going to reduce their use, or any network designed to stop mains interference. I am still licenced, but hardly ever use the radios now, the traffic sensors and powerline adaptors have killed the QRP idea. Gone are the days of getting messages across the pond on 5 watt, it is full power 400 watt today or nothing.
 
dependiong on the walls , construction of house - tanks/water wifi can be blocked and so a powerline adapter can be useful

I actually changed powerline for a mesh hub network - set of 3 transmitters around the house all connected by wifi - and its much much better then the powerline / wireless adapter i used to have ,

Will the above be something similar to what you have?
 
How does 2.5mm cable, supposedly fitted decades ago, make the wifi connection stronger?

Rather than wifi, they use mains signalling, to link the two units together, via you plug circuit. It goes wifi > first unit > 2.5mm > second unit > back to wifi. Obviously, with so much translation between, the link will be quite slow. There is no guarantee that even then, it will work - there is more chance, if there is not much else on the circuit, and both devices are on the same plug circuit. Item with filters, like washing machine, computers, etc. reduce your chances.

The best thing, is a wired LAN cable, second best a wifi repeater, linked by cable, worst is usually are these units.
 
You don't need something sold as an "extender" or "mesh" system. Just set up another wifi access point that has the same name and password as the main one, your devices will then automatically switch between them.

Alternatively, if you use a different name then you can set up both names on some or all devices and they will switch automatically, plus you can manually choose too. E.g. I deliberately stay off the main wifi network while my other half's working from home so I don't disrupt her online meetings. Her PC doesn't even know the details of my wifi network so won't ever use it.

You need a means of connecting the new access point back to the router. LAN cable is best, wifi is less good but sometimes acceptable, powerline also works. Definitely avoid anything non-standard, especially if it's dependent upon their internet server.
 
The powerline network adaptors have been a problem for many years, there have been attempts to ban them due to interference caused, but it is the use of them, not there manufacture which breaks the rules, so just like the bits of plastic we can plug into sockets which instead of making them safer for children make them more dangerous, they can still be sold, and in some cases we the users don't even know we have them, I think they were built into SkyQ boxes?

The use of SPD is likely going to reduce their use, or any network designed to stop mains interference. I am still licenced, but hardly ever use the radios now, the traffic sensors and powerline adaptors have killed the QRP idea. Gone are the days of getting messages across the pond on 5 watt, it is full power 400 watt today or nothing.
Bit out of date there Eric 1KW now
 
You don't need something sold as an "extender" or "mesh" system. Just set up another wifi access point that has the same name and password as the main one, your devices will then automatically switch between them.

Alternatively, if you use a different name then you can set up both names on some or all devices and they will switch automatically, plus you can manually choose too. E.g. I deliberately stay off the main wifi network while my other half's working from home so I don't disrupt her online meetings. Her PC doesn't even know the details of my wifi network so won't ever use it.

You need a means of connecting the new access point back to the router. LAN cable is best, wifi is less good but sometimes acceptable, powerline also works. Definitely avoid anything non-standard, especially if it's dependent upon their internet server.
With your suggestion that does mean a ether net cable being plugged into main router and then into another extender somewhere in the house

I've changed the names on the mesh, regardless of having same name the device would still be connected to the access point and then won't automatically connect to the nearest one
 
regardless of having same name the device would still be connected to the access point and then won't automatically connect to the nearest one
That's a defect in your device. Giving all the APs the same settings is just how it's supposed to be done [not all on the same channel though!].
 
Bit out of date there Eric 1KW now
I have not transmitted in years, I keep up the UK licence, the VR2 and VP8 licenced have expired, but where I live there is just one other ham and I never did get into HF, just 2 meter and 70 cm. I use the handy as a safety item so I know train movements when working on the railway, but monitor only, I do not transmit.
 
I have not transmitted in years, I keep up the UK licence, the VR2 and VP8 licenced have expired, but where I live there is just one other ham and I never did get into HF, just 2 meter and 70 cm. I use the handy as a safety item so I know train movements when working on the railway, but monitor only, I do not transmit.
A fair few changes last month, including higher power for most users and bands.
 

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