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YART - Yet Another Router Table question

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by elcaro, 10 Jul 2020.

  1. elcaro

    elcaro

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    Hi chaps, I bought a router recently (before the virus), an old one, Ferm FBF 6E.
    Now looking at router tables. I've looked at various pictures including on here showing home-made router tables. What I can't understand is this: say I get a bit of ply, cut a hole in it and (somehow) fasten the router to it. Now when pushed down (or up, as it would be in use) to the max, the bit only sticks out, what, 2 centimetres past the base, so not much showing past the surface of the ply. Can anyone advise please? TIA
    Terry.
     
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  3. foxhole

    foxhole

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  4. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Google collet extenders
     
  5. big-all

    big-all

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    job and knock its a 550w similar to the trend little unn more a trimmer than a router
    not really a table choice other than very small light moulding applications (y)

    elcaro you tend to need 800-1200 for light 1/4" table or 1500-2000w for a full table capacity
    most jobs with a less than say 800w are far far quicker with a hand held and roller bearing guided cutter
     
    Last edited: 11 Jul 2020
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  7. elcaro

    elcaro

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    big-all, yeah I'm only looking at small light stuff. I haven't had much practice but I don't seem to be able to get much accuracy out of using a roller bearing guided cutter free-hand. Me or the machine, dunno which. (A bad workman and all that!) I'm new to this tool but I thought if I could fasten the router then move the work against a fence (as in a table) it might be more accurate and less scary.
    JobAndKnock yes I'll have a look at those.
    foxhole, yes, I've seen these plates on the web. Sorry to be thick, but how are they fitted exactly please? If I cut a hole the size/shape of the plate it'll just drop straight through. If I cut a circular hole for the router to poke through, the plate will be its thickness (e.g. 8 mm) above the ply. Could you explain in idiot language please?
    Thanks all.
    Terry.
     
  8. conny

    conny

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    You don't need the plate to be 8mm thick. Most manufactured tables have plastic inserts which are only 3-4mm thick.
    They are set into a recess in the wooden table top which has a circular hole in to accommodate your router base. The insert then has a central hole to suit the chuck of your router and 4 holes drilled in the insert to screw through into the base of your router. This is the kind of thing you want to mount on top of your table top.

    https://smile.amazon.co.uk/KKmoon-A...jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

    It comes with various plates to suit your router. The closer the hole diameter to your router chuck/cutter the less danger of the wood 'dipping' into the hole. Pick a brand and google the assembly instructions to see how they are fitted.
     
  9. big-all

    big-all

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    the very best way to hold any trim/small router is one handed putting your control and "push" right at the bottom over the cutter it very very easy to get a bad "wavy" edge if the control is above the base as you not only need to propel the machine along you need to keep both the base fully in contact with the work but also the bearing
    now dont try one handed with a two knob machine but only one designed for one handed
    now another reason for a hand held over a table is
    if you timber is bowed and out say 5mm over 2ft/600m dosn't sound a lot and may be within tolerences but on a table your rebate or moulding will loose some or all off the depth and require a load off weight to overcome the bow making it dangerous
    where as a hand held will loose a bit with the curve but but virtually nought as the base is only perhaps 110mm wide
     
  10. elcaro

    elcaro

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    Thanks chaps. Yeah last year I did a night school course where I first got introduced to the router, hadn't used one before, maybe I just need more practice!
    Terry.
     
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