Carbon Monoxide

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by EnglishWombat, 24 Jan 2012.

  1. EnglishWombat

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    Hi,

    Firstly, this post may sound a little paranoid and I admit that and I know little about central heating or anything like that...

    But my question is how possible (or impossible) is it to get carbon monoxide poisoning from central heating and where would it leak from? Can it leak from radiators or just boilers? Is there any way it can leak into your bedroom?

    I guess I'd like someone to put my mind at ease. I was ill the other night very quickly... feeling sick, dizzy, chest hurting, breathlessness, etc. It got quite bad and I had to stand outside and take in the fresh air. I also have dry patches on my skin and I woke up the other day with a very dry throat that's keeping me up at night. So what could cause this? Bad ventilation? I do spend a lot of time in my room and the heating makes it stuffy. The windows were blocked with tissue because of cold drafts (not anymore now)

    Thanks.
     
  2. Onetap

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    The boiler; typically a leaking or blocked boiler flue. Any process that involves combustion can produce carbon monoxide (CO), so boilers, paraffin heaters, solid fuel fires & stoves, gas fires, cooking, candles, car exhausts can produce CO. If you suspect you are suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning, I'd suggest you see your doctor and mention the possibility. I believe they can have a blood test done that will prove or disprove your suspicion.

    Any suspect gas appliance should be turned off and not used until tested and proved safe by a GasSafe registered technician.
     
  3. 45yearsagasman

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    Do you have your gas appliances regularly serviced and checked I wonder, and get a CO detector, but get yourself checked out first.
     
  4. EnglishWombat

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    I don't know. I'm 21 and I live in my parents house. I told my dad and he says we don't have a CO detector because "the boiler is in the conservatory and not in the house, so it's fine." I don't know what to think. I was worried I'm getting it in my room, but I read things online that tell me that's almost impossible. And surely if there was a leak somewhere... wouldn't my parents be ill too?
     
  5. 45yearsagasman

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    Then you're old enough to look after yourself follow some simple advice. Get a CO detector and get checked out.
     
  6. EnglishWombat

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    Can someone please answer my other questions?

    Can it leak from radiators or just boilers? Is there any way it can leak into your bedroom through the radiators or something?

    Also, can a central heating boiler actually leak carbon monoxide? My dad told me it's okay because our boiler is in the conservatory and not indoors....
     
  7. misterdubya

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    Read THIS

    The radiators wont procuce CO. Are you sure this is not a wind up as your asking some very silly questions. :rolleyes:
     
  8. EnglishWombat

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    Lol. I'm sorry. It's probably silly to you because I know nothing about this and you do. I have anxiety issues too, so I guess that doesn't help. But it's sillier not to ask about something you're curious about.
     
  9. misterdubya

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    I hoped the link would put your mind at rest. I take it you have read it - I assume at 21 you understand it?

    Take the advice already given and get down the quacks. Buy an audable CO alarm. You may be saving not only your own life, but your families too.

    Mr. W.
     
  10. Onetap

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    Just the boiler.

    Most old boilers had a conventional flue, i.e. they took air for combustion from the room and the flue gases went up a flue/chimney poked up and through the wall or ceiling. There are still some of these in use, but they are less common.

    Most modern boiler are room sealed, i.e., they take air from outside and blow the flue gases back outside through a flue terminal. These are a lot safer since the flue gases shouldn't spill into the building, unless the boiler is defective. You can get CO getting into a building from outside, but this is very uncommon.

    If you're feeling ill, the cause could be many things other than CO, so the right procedure is to get yourself along to a doctor. The cause could be something you hadn't expected, e.g., an allergy like asthma or eczema; those spring to mind because one of my kids suffered from them.
     
  11. onlyfitidealboilers

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    You mate are paranoid are you a gas man!! Go the doctors! Are you one of these who gets a sore throat an all of a sudden you think you have throat cancer...?!
     
  12. EnglishWombat

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    Thanks, onetap. Could just be bad ventilation in my room. I've had the window open all night. It's cold in there, but feeling better.

    Lol. No, onlyfit, I'm not THAT bad. But I understand I sound like a nutter on here. I guess I had to so people on here can tell me I'm worrying over nothing.

    I'm due to see the doctor soon anyway, so I'll bring it up.
     
  13. seashore

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    Hi

    No question is silly, especially related to carbon monoxide. Here are a few answers to your questions...
    Carbon monoxide can seep through walls and floors, so the fact that your boiler is in the conservatory will not automatically rule out that the gas is not present.

    If you live in a terrace or semi-detached house carbon monoxide can be getting into your room from next door (not just boilers emit carbon monoxide, wood burners and open fires do too).

    The only true way to detect for carbon monoxide is buy an alarm.

    If you feel sick, dizzy or have a headache that you often suffer in one room but it goes when you either go outside or leave the room there could be carbon monoxide present.

    If your family do not take the possibility seriously then maybe you should buy an alarm yourself, they are quite inexpensive.

    All I would say is 'don't delay, buy a carbon monoxide alarm today!'
     
  14. FiremanT

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  15. oilman

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    Beware of cheap anything, especially alarms. They can give false warnings when there is no problem, or they may fail to work. I have had to look at this as a customer bought an alarm and told me the boiler was leaking CO. I went with my gas analyser which showed zero CO. The alarm was faulty.

    The safe approach is to have adequate ventilation. Draughts are distributed ventilation, so learn to appreciate them. They also reduce damp, condensation, mould, and temperature (try putting on appropriate clothes). Being a bit cooler is healthier than living in a zip-lock bag, and there is no overpowering smell of garlic, sweat, fartgas and more.
     

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